CPX Regulatory Update for January 23, 2020

Below is a numbered list of the regulatory proceedings we are tracking, followed by a brief summary of background information, new or recent developments, and Climate Center filings, if any, for each of the proceedings. Note that these are intended as very brief highlights of selected key actions and activities. For details on any of these proceedings, we suggest logging in to the relevant proceeding page on the CPUC’s website. An expedient way to do that is to click on the proceeding number below or visit http://www.cpuc.ca.gov/documents/ Please contact us at info[at]cleanpowerexhange.org to report any errors or broken links.

Brief Notes:
  • The next CPUC voting meeting is scheduled for February 6 in Bakersfield. See AGENDA (Click on “current agenda”). For the livestream, click HERE.
  • We continue to monitor wildfire and PG&E bankruptcy-related proceedings but no longer report on those items on a regular basis. We will report occasionally on any significant developments.
  • January 22 – PG&E Bankruptcy update: Gov. Gavin Newsom filed a formal objection to PG&E’s bankruptcy plan and reiterated his willingness to take over the utility as a last resort. Story in the Sacramento Bee.
  • January 18 – Wildfire payments claims tug-of-war between FEMA and PG&E. Article in Chico Enterprise.
Regulatory Proceedings we are monitoring:
  1. SB 1339 Microgrid Rulemaking R.19-09-009
  2. PG&E Safety Culture Investigation 15-08-019
  3. Self Generation Incentive Program (SGIP) R.12-11-005
  4. Power Charge Indifference Adjustment (PCIA)  17-06-026
  5. Resource Adequacy (RA) 17-09-020
  6. Integrated Resource Plans (IRP) 16-02-007
  7. Distribution Resource Plans (DRP) 14-08-013 
  8. Renewables Portfolio Standard (RPS) 18-07-003
  9. Integrated Distributed Energy Resources 4-10-003
  10. SB 790 IOU Code of Conduct 12-02-009
  11. Direct Access 19-03-009
  12. NEM Successor Tariff 14-07-002
Closed proceedings that matter:
  • CCA Rulemaking 03-10-003 – This was the rulemaking that defined all the rules pursuant to AB 117, the original California CCA law
  • CCA Bond and Re-Entry Fees 18-05-022 – This is the proceeding that re-set the bond required to be posted by CCAs in the event that the CCA fails and customers are returned to the incumbent utility

Summaries:

1. SB 1339 Microgrid Rulemaking R.19-09-009

The Climate Center is a Party to this proceeding.

Key Documents:

Recent Developments:

  • January 21 – CPUC staff and IOU Resiliency proposals filed; ALJ Ruling seeking comments on Track 1. (note: many parties, including The Climate Center, have submitted a request for an extension of the comment period)
  • December 30, 2019: Ruling Directing Respondents to Address Ruling Questions as Part of Their January 21, 2020 Proposal
  • December 20, 2019: Scoping Ruling.

Next Steps:

  • January 30 – Comments on the resiliency proposals due (note: many parties, including The Climate Center, have submitted a request for an extension of the comment period)
  • February 6 – Reply comments on resiliency proposals due
  • Summer 2020 – Track 1 concludes.

 

2. PG&E Safety Culture Investigation 15-08-019

The Climate Center is a Party to this proceeding.

Key Documents:

  • June 18 CPUC Order seeking proposals to improve PG&E safety culture
  • July 19 Climate Center Comments

Recent Developments:

  • December 13 – Letter from several LSEs, including a CCA, to CPUC Commissioners expressing interest in taking ownership of PG&E grid assets

Next Steps:

  • May 8, 2020 is the deadline for the conclusion of this investigation; it is not clear what steps may be taken prior to May 8

 

3. Self Generation Incentive Program (SGIP) R.12-11-005

The Climate Center’s filing for Party status was filed on January 3rd, 2020 and is pending.

Key Documents:

Recent Developments:

  • January 18, 2020 – Commission heat pump workshop
  • December 19, 2019 – Proposed Decision.  This Decision grants the joint Petition for Modification filed by Southern California Gas Company, Pacific Gas and Electric Company, Southern California Edison Company, and the Center for Sustainable Energy and modifies Decision (D.) 11-09-015 and D.16-06-055 to remove the Self-Generation Incentive Program application fee for residential projects.

Next Steps:

  • January 31, 2020 – Administrators to submit Tier 1 advice letter containing final SGIP accounting data as of December 31, 2019
  • February 6, 2020 – Earliest possible vote on whether to remove the SGIP application fee for residential projects
  • April 1, 2020 – SGIP modifications effective.

 

4. Power Charge Indifference Adjustment (PCIA)  17-06-026

Key Documents:

Recent Developments:

  • January 22, ALJ Ruling to modify the proceeding schedule for Working Group Three
  • December 11 Working Group 3 Presentation
  • December 9, 2019: Working Group 2 Final Report (Prepayment Issues)

Next Steps:

  • Q1 2020 – Proposed Decision on Working Group 2 issues
  • Q2 2020 – Resolution of Working Group 3 issues

 

5. Resource Adequacy (RA) 17-09-020

Key Documents:

Recent Developments:

  • January 14, 2020 – Assigned Commissioner’s Ruling on Energy Division’s Resource Adequacy State of the Market Report [Energy Division’s second Resource Adequacy State of the Market report is attached to this ruling as Appendix A]
  • December 23. 2019 – Order granting CalCCA’s request for a stay of D.19-10-021 (Decision Affirming Resource Adequacy Import Rules)
  • November 17, 2019 – New RA Proceeding for 2020/2021 R.19-11-009

Background: The RA program is designed to provide adequate electric resources to CAISO to ensure safe and reliable operation of the grid, and to provide appropriate incentives for the siting and construction of new resources needed for reliability. This proceeding has been divided into three Tracks due to the complexity of the issues involved.

 

6. Integrated Resource Plans (IRP) 16-02-007

Key Documents:

Recent Developments:

  • January 3, 2020 – Administrative Law Judge’s Final Baseline Ruling finalizing a baseline for purposes of procurement required by Decision 19-11-016

Background: The IRP proceeding is an umbrella planning proceeding to consider all of the CPUC’s electric procurement policies and programs. The goal is to provide a safe, reliable, and cost-effective electricity supply while complying with SB 350 mandates for LSE energy resource portfolios. LSEs will be required to file individual IRPs, which will then be considered in developing a Preferred System Plan (PSP).

 

7. Distribution Resource Plans (DRP) 14-08-013 

Key Documents: See Proceeding

Recent Developments:

  • November 21, 2019: Notice of Reassignment of Commissioner [R.14-08-013, A.15-07-002, A.15-07-003 and A.15-07-006] are being reassigned to President Marybel Batjer
  • November 8, 2019: Administrative Law Judge’s Ruling requesting comments on possible improvements to the 2020 Distribution Investment Deferred Framework process. Opening comments shall be filed and served by January 17, 2020. Reply comments shall be filed and served by January 31, 2020.

Background: This proceeding consolidates numerous proceedings and seeks to establish policies, procedures, and rules for investor-owned electric utilities (IOUs) to develop Distribution Resources Plan (DRP) Proposals, and to evaluate the IOUs’ infrastructure and planning to incorporating distributed energy resources into their systems. There are 3 parallel and concurrent Tracks in this proceeding. Track 1 concerns methodological issues. Track 2 concerns demonstration and pilot projects. Track 3 concerns policy issues. Track 3 also has 3 Sub-tracks. Although Decisions have been issued on all Tracks, there remain residual issues as well as newly identified issues within the scope of the proceeding.

 

8. Renewables Portfolio Standard (RPS) 18-07-003

Recent Developments:

  • December 19, 2019: Final Decision on 2019 RPS Plans. (and Proposed Decision on 2019 RPS Plans)
    • CCAs shall demonstrate, describe, and timeline actions necessary for 2019 procurement plan compliance within 30 days of 12/30/19
    • CCAs shall plan for the long-term procurement compliance period 2021-2024
    • CCAs shall furnish the CPUC copies of any contracts they enter into no later than 30 days following the date they intend to serve load, and in no event later than August 1, 2020
    • By March 31, 2020, Energy Division shall initiate stakeholder workshops before filing of the 2020 draft RPS Plans
    • RPS and IRP filings shall be consolidated
    • All LSEs shall analyze the impact of economic curtailment, over-generation or oversupply events on their individual resource portfolios in their future RPS Procurement Plans
    • PG&E’s Renewable Energy Credit sales framework is approved with modifications. The pricing that PG&E seeks is rejected; PG&E may use its previously approved price floor methodology or the methodology proposed by the Public Advocates Office
    • For 2020, CCAs and Electric Service Providers (ESPs) shall include more granular information regarding planning in the next annual procurement plan cycle, beyond a general statement that they will comply with the Renewables Portfolio Standard requirements and upcoming long-term procurement requirements

 

9. Integrated Distributed Energy Resources 4-10-003

No new developments.

Key Documents:

Background: Since 2007, the Commission has sought to integrate demand-side energy solutions and technologies through utility program offerings. Decision (D.07-10-032) directs that utilities “integrate customer demand-side programs, such as energy efficiency, self-generation, advanced metering, and demand response, in a coherent and efficient manner.” The Commission’s IDER Action Plan published in 2016 remains in draft form.

 

10. SB 790 IOU Code of Conduct 12-02-009

Key Documents:

Recent Updates. No recent updates.

  • January 30 2018 – This proceeding re-emerged as a concern when the IOUs filed a Joint Petition for Modification to the rules imposed on them regarding lobbying against CCAs.

Background: Original CCA law, AB 117 stipulates that IOUs must “cooperate fully” with local governments pursuing Community Choice. In the mid-to-late 2000s, San Francisco, Marin, and the San Joaquin Valley experienced egregious disinformation campaigns waged by the incumbent utility for these jurisdictions against their efforts. The obstruction was documented in a series of California Senate Select Committee on Renewable Energy hearings in 2010 chaired by Senator Mark Leno. The result of the hearings was SB 790, which created an IOU Code of Conduct that prohibits IOUs from marketing against CCAs unless they establish a separate marketing division that does not use ratepayer funds, among other provisions.

 

11. Direct Access 19-03-009

Key Documents:

  • March 14, 2019 CPUC issued an Order Instituting Rulemaking (OIR) for proceeding R. 19-03-009 regarding implementation of Senate Bill 237 (SB 237 – Hertzberg) concerning expansion of the Direct Access (DA) program.

Recent Updates. No recent updates.

Background: DA is available to non-residential customers. Background: DA access was restricted after the energy crisis by SB 1X. DA access is currently capped and accessible via a lottery system, with 7,603 GWh of load on the waitlist. SB 237 increases the maximum total annual kilowatt-hours allowed under the DA program by a total of 4,000 GWh apportioned among the three IOU service territories. That increase must be implemented by June 1, 2019. SB 237 also gives CPUC until June 1, 2020 to provide the legislature with guidance on expanding DA access to all interested non-residential customers. The proceeding will have two phases to address the two mandates.

 

12. Net Energy Metering (NEM) Successor Tariff 14-07-002

Key Documents:

Recent Updates: No recent updates. The NEM successor tariff had been expected to be initiated in 2019. It wasn’t.

Background: Pursuant to direction in the NEM Successor Tariff Decision, the Commission was supposed to have reviewed the NEM successor tariff some time in 2019, when the proceedings related to distributed energy resources were to have been completed and after default TOU rates were implemented. Energy Division staff had planned to explore compensation structures for customer-sited distributed generation other than NEM, as well as consider an export compensation rate that takes into account locational and time-differentiated values. On April 26, 2019, the Energy Division distributed a Revised Solar Information Packet to service list R.14-07-002 and R.12-11-005.  The Energy Division asked for written comments about the content of the Revised Solar Information Packet and implementation approach.  The deadlines for submitting written comments has passed. If you have questions contact Kerry Fleisher at the CPUC Energy Division: Kerry.Fleisher@cpuc.ca.gov

Next Steps: Unknown

CPX Legislative Update for January 23, 2020

Below are several, but not all, of the key bills we are tracking. For a complete list of bills we are tracking in 2020, click HERE. We do expect many more bills relating to Community Choice, electricity system resilience, microgrids, the climate crisis, and other related issues to emerge, so expect a lively 2020 session. We will be adding new bill numbers as the 2020 session progresses. Please let us know what energy or climate legislation your representative is cooking up! Send us an email to info[at]cleanpowerexchange.org. Our next update will be published on February 6.

 

AB 56 (Garcia) OPPOSE – This bill will empower the CPUC to order energy procurement based on real or perceived shortcomings in the Integrated Resource Plans submitted by Investor Owned Utilities, Direct Access providers, and CCAs. The bill will allow the CPUC to require procurement on any perceived deficiency that may be 10 to 12 years out in the future. This makes no sense, given that so much lead time would allow a CCA to address any potential problem. Read the Center’s July 2019 Letter of Opposition.

STATUS: No committee assignment and no hearing date set.

 

AB 235 (Mayes) – Now dubbed the “Catastrophic Wildfire Liability Recovery Act,” this bill will allow PG&E to issue bonds to cover 2017, 2018 wildfire liabilities that ratepayers could ultimately have to pay for, and allows the CPUC to arbitrarily set a limit on the amount a transmission & distribution utility must pay as a result of catastrophic wildfire that may have been the result of their infrastructure. It is essentially a defense of status quo corporate utility dominance.

STATUS: In the Senate Energy Committee. No hearing scheduled.

 

AB 1503 (Burke) – Existing law requires the CPUC, by February 1 of each year, to report to the Governor and the Legislature on recommendations for a smart grid, the plans and deployment of smart grid technologies by the State’s electrical corporations, and the costs and benefits to ratepayers. This bill would amend Section 913.2 of the Public Utilities Code to require in the report due on February 1, 2022, that the CPUC also describe workforce opportunities in the areas of distributed energy and microgrids, including emerging energy jobs and professions and the costs and benefits to the ratepayers. The bill would require the CPUC to collaborate with the Labor and Workforce Development Agency in the development of this section of the report.

STATUS: In the Asm Natural Resources Committee with no hearing scheduled.

 

AB 1839 (Bonta) – The “Green New Deal” bill. Introduced on January 6, this bill would create the California Green New Deal Council with a specified membership appointed by the Governor. The bill would require the California Green New Deal Council to submit a specified report to the Legislature no later than January 1, 2022.

STATUS: No committee staff bill analysis is available, the bill has not been scheduled for a hearing, and we have yet to take a position.

 

AB 1847 (Levine) – This bill would authorize the CPUC (contingent on the Commission finding that an electrical corporation is not complying with State law, rules, or regulations) to appoint a public administrator to the electrical corporation for a period not to exceed 180 days. The bill would vest the public administrator with oversight authority over the electrical corporation’s activities that impact public safety. See the bill author’s factsheet.

STATUS: On January 17, referred to the Assembly Utilities & Energy Committee.

 

SB 246 (Wieckowski) – Read our Support Letter. – This bill, if enacted as written, will impose an oil and gas severance tax on the privilege of extracting oil or fossil gas from the earth or water in California upon any operator engaged in such extraction. Read the bill author’s factsheet.

STATUS: SB 246 is dead. On January 15, the Chair of the Senate Governance and Finance Committee removed the bill from its agenda, effectively killing the bill. Contact the bill author’s office with questions.

 

SB 350 (Hertzberg) OPPOSE – This bill would “authorize the CPUC to consider a multiyear centralized resource adequacy mechanism,” meaning, a central buyer, which would encroach on CCA statutory authority on procurement autonomy. This bill was a tandem bill with AB 56.

STATUS: In Senate Energy Committee with no hearing scheduled.

 

SB 378 (Wiener): Would establish ratepayer protections related to Public Safety Power Shutoff incidents.

STATUS: Voted out of Se. Energy Committee on Jan. 15 with author’s amendments. Referred to Appropriations Committee and scheduled for a hearing TODAY, January 23.

 

SB 386 (Caballero) – Read our Letter of Opposition. This bill would allow Turlock, Modesto, and Merced Irrigation Districts to count their large hydro assets (dams) toward their Renewable Portfolio Standard (RPS) obligations. This would significantly impact progress with new renewables. These Irrigation Districts will already be able to count their dams as carbon-free pursuant to state policy on decarbonization and mechanisms are in place to protect low-income communities from any cost burdens.

STATUS: On January 15, 2020, this bill was held in the Senate Energy Committee pursuant to Senate Rule 29.10.

 

SB 702 (Hill) – This bill would amend section 399.13 of the Public Utilities Code to authorize a retail seller of electricity to rely on contracts of 10 years or more in duration or ownership agreements entered into directly by its end-use customer for eligible renewable energy resources located on the customer side of the meter to satisfy the portion of the 65% requirement attributable to the retail sales of that end-use customer.

STATUS: Out of the committees to the Senate Floor for a second reading.

 

SB-772 (Bradford) – OPPOSE – This bill relates to procurement of long duration bulk energy storage. Would require CAISO to procure 2,000MW of long-duration energy storage projects by 2022. Concerns center on forcing the hand of CCA procurement.

STATUS: In the Senate committee process with no committee assignment and no hearing date.

 

SB 774 (Stern) – SB 774 would require IOUs to collaborate with the State’s Office of Emergency of Services and others to identify where back-up electricity sources may provide increased electrical distribution grid resiliency and would allow the IOUs to file applications with the CPUC to invest in, and deploy, microgrids to increase resiliency. Concerns focus on too much control being placed in the hands of the IOUs over microgrid development when other LSEs and stakeholders can and should play a role.

STATUS: In the Assembly committee process with no committee assignment and no hearing date.

 

SB-801 (Glazer, McGuire) Electrical corporations: wildfire mitigation plans: deenergization: public safety protocol. This bill would require an electrical corporation to deploy backup electrical resources or provide financial assistance for backup electrical resources to a customer receiving a medical baseline allowance if the customer meets those conditions.

STATUS: Scheduled to be heard in the Senate Energy Committee.

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In the news… Rapid Decarbonization!

Clean Power Exchange introducing new content: The Climate Center’s Rapid Decarbonization Initiative

Since 2016, Clean Power Exchange (CPX) e-news has built a solid reputation for sharing news and information about Community Choice Aggregation (CCA) and other significant clean energy developments in California. More recently, with the launch of our Advanced Community Energy (ACE) initiative, our e-news has grown to encompass a broader perspective with inclusion of more news and information about decentralized energy resource development, community microgrids, and other energy topics not directly related to CCA.

A big part of the purpose of creating the CPX e-news was to help build the CCA movement in California. With over 150 cities and 20 counties participating in 20 CCAs and growing, and with the ever-increasing power of the California Community Choice Association advocating CCA interests in the regulatory and legislative arenas, it can be argued that the movement has largely been built – mission accomplished!

CPX will continue to cover CCA and ACE-related news, but in 2020 we will broaden our scope to include The Climate Center’s flagship campaign, the campaign for rapid decarbonization. With climate impacts hitting harder and faster, the time we have to act in ways that meaningfully address the core of the problem, GHG emissions, is running out. The goal of the Rapid Decarbonization for a Climate-safe California campaign, launched in late 2019, is to enact by 2025 in California the bold policies required by science to be on track for a safe climate by 2030, securing a vibrant, equitable, and healthful future for all.

Key components of the campaign include:

  • Ensuring a just and equitable transition;
  • Achieving by 2022 a formal commitment by the State of California to carbon neutrality by 2030 and net negative emissions by 2035;
  • Create 100% clean, distributed, resilient energy & storage by 2030;
  • Embarking on a formal phase-out fossil fuel-powered vehicles beginning in 2025 with a goal of 80% sustainable (carbon-free) mobility by 2030;
  • Sequestering 100+ million metric tons of additional CO2e per year through healthy soils and vegetation management by 2030.

To learn more about the campaign click HERE for a brief overview, and to download our full prospectus as a pdf document, click HERE.

Unprecedented times call for unprecedented action

The Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change graph included in this blog is that body’s best collective effort at projecting what it will take for a 50% chance for a pathway to limiting warming to 1.5 degrees celsius by 2100. Will this be enough? The global climate crisis is an emergency with the highest possible stakes: the future of life on Earth. The gradual progress that has characterized the climate movement to date is woefully inadequate and we are running out of time to avoid long-lasting and/or irreversible impacts. Starting now, not decades from now, solving the climate crisis must be the top global priority with every government, organization, business, community, and individual. Therefore, CPX will be incorporating this priority more prominently and frequently into its standard fare. The time is now for more ambitious climate action in California, serving as an example to inspire and move the rest of the U.S. and the world.

Please share your feedback and interest in partnering together by emailing the Rapid Decarb team at: rapid-decarb@theclimatecenter.org

 

 

Largest CCA Renewable Project Comes Online

REDWOOD CITY, CA – January, 22, 2020 – The largest renewable energy installation ever built for a Community Choice Aggregation (CCA) agency is officially online.

Peninsula Clean Energy this month began providing more solar power to California’s San Mateo County from the 200-megawatt utility-scale Wright Solar Project located in the nearby Central Valley.

“This is actual new steel in the ground that will send more clean and affordable power to our customers,” Peninsula Clean Energy CEO Jan Pepper said. “As a leader among CCAs in California and nationwide, we are proving that aggressive movement toward 100 percent carbon-free power can be both environmentally and economically beneficial. Wright Solar is just the beginning of what is possible for providing good jobs and strong economic benefits to areas such as Merced County in California’s Central Valley.”

Peninsula Clean Energy has an exclusive 25-year power purchase agreement with Wright Solar Park LLC to buy all of the facility’s electricity to power more than 100,000 San Mateo County homes.

The solar facility was constructed by Swinerton Renewable Energy with roughly 400 union workers from the surrounding areas that were hired as part of a five-union project labor agreement. That agreement was a result of Peninsula Clean Energy’s workforce policy requirements developed in consultation with local building trades and other unions.

“This project illustrates the vast potential that solar and other renewable generation can have in Merced County and Central California, from new construction jobs to millions of dollars in new tax revenues,” said Lloyd Pareira, chairman of the Merced County Board of Supervisors.

“The Wright Solar Project showcases how local hires can complete a project in an amazing timeframe and provide a huge economic stimulus to the surrounding community,” said Bobby Stutzman, business manager at International Brotherhood of Electrical Workers Local 684. “This is also one of those projects that will transcend construction and can be used by the building trades and other unions as a model for future labor agreements.”

Laborers, electricians, iron workers, carpenters, operators and engineers – many from the Bakersfield and Fresno areas – joined forces to install roughly 650,000 4-by-2-foot solar panels and accompanying equipment in only 11 months.

The Wright project is owned by Centaurus Renewable Energy and the construction and operations are managed by Clēnera, LLC.

The project adds to an escalating trend of new development spearheaded by CCAs that is advancing clean energy, economic development and green jobs throughout California and elsewhere. California’s 19 CCAs have on average added roughly 1,000 MW annually in long-term renewable energy purchase agreements, and are expected to make long-term investments in more than 10,000 MW of new clean energy resources and energy storage by 2030.

That includes a joint solicitation in November from Peninsula Clean Energy and three other Bay Area CCAs for the installation of more than 30 MW of battery storage to 6,000 homes and hundreds of businesses, adding a clean and resilient backstop to areas hit by PG&E power shutoffs.

 

About Peninsula Clean Energy

Peninsula Clean Energy launched in October 2016 as California’s fifth CCA and is the official local electricity provider for all of San Mateo County. Peninsula Clean Energy has the goal of providing 100 percent  greenhouse gas-free power by 2021 and estimates that its lower rates are already saving its 290,000 San Mateo County customers an estimated $18 million a year compared to PG&E. Find out more at peninsulacleanenergy.com.

 

About Clenera, LLC

Clenera, LLC (“Clēnera”) based in Boise, Idaho, is an end-to-end utility-scale solar development and asset management service provider focused exclusively on utility-scale solar projects in the continental United States. Clēnera relies on its experienced executive team and professional staff to identify the best projects and manage each project from pre-construction development and design through construction and commercial operation. Clēnera utilizes an efficient finance, development, construction and operations platform to consistently deliver low cost and reliable clean energy from the projects it manages. By the end of 2018, Clēnera is on-target to have constructed over 900 MWDC of utility-scale solar. For more information, visit www.clenera.com.

 

About Swinerton Renewable Energy

Swinerton Renewable Energy (SRE) offers engineering, procurement, construction, and SOLV® services for solar photovoltaic plants throughout North America to a diverse range of clients. Over 130 years of building landmark projects, Swinerton has forged a reputation for unsurpassed safety, workmanship, on-time delivery, and customer satisfaction. Today, our team takes pride in building cost-effective solar systems that will generate reliable, clean power for many years to come. SRE has delivered over 3.5 GW of solar projects and our SOLV team manages over 4.5 GW of PV plants. Learn more at swinertonrenewable.com.

 

Media Contact

Darren Goode

Peninsula Clean Energy

dgoode@peninsulacleanenergy.com

(202) 550-6619

Rethinking Wholesale Metering for Community Choice Aggregators

In my April 2018 CPX blog, Method Used To Calculate Wholesale Electricity Cost May Result In Losses And Liabilities, I pointed out the potential cost and risk implications of the current method with which most Community Choice Aggregators (CCAs), particularly those in PG&E services territory, meter and settle their wholesale energy transactions. This wholesale metering method is commonly known as Settlement Quality Meter Data (SQMD). 

In response to its challenges, a new and improved CCA wholesale metering technique has been developed. Over the past two years, this new CCA wholesale metering technique has been approved by both California Independent System Operators (CAISO) and the California Public Utilities Commission (CPUC), and independently verified and audited by a consulting firm. 

We have accumulated substantial real-world operating experience with the new and improved method, and in the process, gained more insights about wholesale metering for CCAs. In this blog, I want to share these insights. And more importantly, I wish to highlight the opportunities that a more accurate, interval-based wholesale metering method can bring to CCAs.

Almost a decade since the first CCAs were launched, technical solutions and best practices for setting up and operationalizing CCAs have increasingly matured and been commoditized. The industry has addressed a set of technical, regulatory and operational challenges of launching and operating CCAs. The new challenges of the CCA business model are now how to operate a CCA in the way that meets its financial and policy objectives. To effectively maximize the dual goals, it is important to maintain the financial viability and optimize revenues so that CCAs can deliver on policy objectives. It turns out that accurate wholesale metering holds one of the most important keys to achieve and optimize the financial strength of CCAs. 

Two CCA Wholesale Metering Methods

Before we dive into the details, let’s first review the two methods used by CCAs to meter their wholesale energy transactions. 

  • The current method, commonly used by most CCAs (particularly by those in PG&E service territory), employs PG&E load profiles as an approximation to the CCAs own load profile. The PG&E load profiles are then used to retrofit the monthly aggregated billing data shared by PG&E into hourly meter data for wholesale metering and settlement purposes. 
  • The new and improved method takes advantage of the interval meter data shared by PG&E directly. After calibration against the billing data, the interval data is aggregated directly into the CCA system load profiles. By aggregating the interval data shared by PG&E into the CCA system load profiles, the new method has the advantage of more precisely calculating the CCA’s actual load profiles, whereas the current method is only an approximation.   

Depending on the CCA, and the season, the interval-based wholesale metering method can improve the accuracy by as much as 25% on an hourly basis.

It is worth pointing out that the challenge of having to rely on the retail meter data for the wholesale metering is unique to CCAs and other retail business models. For Investor Owned Utilities (IOUs), wholesale metering traditionally leverages a set of wholesale meters, which meter the total amount of energy delivery in the points of energy injections. The wholesale metering system involves a different set of meters than the retail meters, from which CCAs are getting their meter data for billing purposes. 

CCAs, as Load Serving Entities (energy suppliers) with no ownership or control of the distribution grid, do not have access to the IOU’s wholesale meter data, and hence have to leverage the IOU’s retail metering system for wholesale metering and settlement purposes. 

The Need to Precisely Meter Wholesale Transactions 

Interval-based CCA wholesale metering is advantageous because of its ability to precisely calculate a CCA’s load profile. The current method uses PG&E’s load profiles as proxies to a CCA’s load profile, which is only an approximation. In reality, each CCA has a different load profile which is distinct from PG&E’s. 

More precise measurement of wholesale energy transactions is driven by the need to more precisely settle energy transactions, as well as to procure the right amount of Resource Adequacy (RA) to meet CPUC requirements. The former is obvious, while the latter requires some additional explanation. 

The CPUC requires that all Load Serving Entities (LSEs), including CCAs, procure a sufficient amount of RA to meet their respective peak demands on an annual and monthly basis. One year in advance, CCAs must demonstrate that they have secured adequate supply capacity and, on a month-ahead basis, that it has procured sufficient energy to meet 115% of monthly peak demand. The higher a CCA’s peak demand, the more RA it needs to procure. In other words, the shape of a CCA’s load profile matters. Even if two CCAs purchase the same amount of electricity in aggregate, the CCA with a peakier load profile would need to procure more RA than the one with a flatter load profile (see Figure 1). RA is expensive and hence there is a need to precisely meter the wholesale demand. In some cases, the difference between the two can be as much as 10% of the wholesale procurement cost.


Comparison of two hypothetical CCAs—one with a flatter load profile (in Yellow) than PG&E’s (in Blue color), and the other with a peakier load profile (in Green). Even if both CCAs procure the same amount of total energy, the CCA with the peakier load profile must procure more RA than the CCA with flatter load profile to meet CPUC requirements.

 

The Current CCA Wholesale Metering Method May Lead to Potential Under or Over Procurement of Resource Adequacy 

The use of PG&E load profiles as approximations of CCA load profiles in CCA wholesale metering can potentially lead to under or over-procurement of RA. For CCAs with flatter load profiles than PG&E’s (for example, CCAs in the coastal climate zone), the current CCA wholesale metering method can potentially lead to over estimation of the peak demand and over-procurement of RA. For CCAs with peakier load profiles than PG&E’s (for example, the CCAs in the inland climate zones), the current wholesale metering method can potentially lead to under estimation of the peak demand and hence result in under-procurement of RA. The amount of RA each CCA has over- or under- procured since its inception, depends on the discrepancies between the CCA’s actual load profiles and PG&E’s. 

The Current CCA Wholesale Metering Method Can Impact CCA Finance  

Given the cost of RA today, the financial impact of over- or under procurement of RA can be significant. It can determine whether a CCA is financially viable or not.  

Potential Regulatory Issues with Current Wholesale Metering Method

The current CCA wholesale metering method, by using PG&E load profiles as approximations for individual CCAs, has additional implications beyond over or under procurement of RA and its impact on CCA finance. 

Since PG&E load profiles represent the socialized (average) load profiles of all communities within PG&E’s service territory, the CCAs with flatter load profiles overpay for RA, while the CCAs with peakier load profiles underpay. In other words, the current method of CCA wholesale metering creates RA-related cost shifts from one CCA to another – shifting of RA procurement cost from CCAs with the peakier load profiles to those with the flatter load profiles.

Opportunities with a More Accurate CCA Wholesale Measurement Method

A more accurate wholesale metering technique not only avoids the cost, risk and regulatory issues of approximating CCA wholesale transactions, but also creates a number of opportunities for CCAs to optimize their financial viability. Through more accurate metering of load profiles, CCAs can develop better rates and Demand Side Management programs to re-shape their load profiles and lower wholesale energy procurement costs. Use of PG&E load profiles as an approximation obscures such opportunity.  

More importantly, given that the load profiles vary for different classes of customers, more accurate determination of the load profiles for different classes of customers will allow CCAs to develop better rates for each customer class to optimize its viability and profitability. The increased viability and profitability will ultimately allow CCAs to invest in more programs that respond to community needs and achieve policy goals.

 

Irvine will pursue ‘community choice’ program to buy its own electric power

Flipping on the lights or running the dishwasher could get a little cheaper and a lot greener in Irvine, under a “community choice” energy program city leaders plan to implement.

Irvine would still depend on and pay Southern California Edison for the use of its electric transmission system – the poles, wires and substations – to deliver power to residents and businesses. But city officials say the community choice program could save customers an estimated 2% compared with Edison’s rates, which can pencil out to big savings for businesses, and it would allow the city to buy electricity from greener sources that could reduce impact on the climate.

“It lets us use power sources that we feel are better for our community,” said Irvine Councilwoman Melissa Fox, who began researching community choice for the city’s Green Ribbon Environmental Committee in 2017. “Why wouldn’t we want cheaper, cleaner power?”

State legislation passed in 2002 made community choice aggregation possible, and in 2010, Marin Energy Authority (now called Marin Clean Energy) was the state’s first community choice agency to launch. Today it serves 34 Bay Area communities.

Read more

SLO and Morro Bay now receive cleaner energy, and it’s cheaper, officials say

new way of receiving cleaner power, called community choice energy, has arrived in San Luis Obispo and Morro Bay, and it will significantly reduce carbon emissions while saving customers money, officials say.

Monterey Bay Community Power, a nonprofit electricity provider serving Central Coast counties, began providing service to the two SLO County cities on Jan. 1.

Electricity will still be powered through PG&E’s infrastructure, and local customers won’t need to change anything about how they receive energy or pay monthly bills.

PG&E previously supplied electricity to those cities, using a combination of carbon and renewable energies.

The community choice energy program focuses on sourcing power from renewables such as wind and solar, as well as hydroelectricity, which is carbon free but technically not a renewable energy source under the government’s definition.

….

Read more

Carlsbad-Solana Beach-Del Mar community choice energy program set to launch in 2021

While an expansive community choice energy program spearheaded by the city of San Diego has drawn attention across the region in recent months, a smaller entity that includes a member with real-time experience in the sector voted Thursday to obtain official certification from state regulators.

“This has everything to do with making sure that we can hit our timeline,” said Cori Schumacher, the chair of what is called the Clean Energy Alliance. She and the other two members of the group’s board adopted a resolution to submit an implementation plan with the California Public Utilities Commission that will create an alternative to San Diego Gas & Electric when it comes to purchasing power sources for customers in Del Mar, Solana Beach and Carlsbad.

The Clean Energy Alliance aims to start serving customers in May 2021.

Read more

CPX Regulatory Update for January 9, 2020

Below is a numbered list of the regulatory proceedings we are tracking, followed by a brief summary of background information, new or recent developments, and Climate Center filings, if any, for each of the proceedings. Note that these are intended as very brief highlights of selected key actions and activities. For details on any of these proceedings, we suggest logging in to the relevant proceeding page on the CPUC’s website. An expedient way to do that is to click on the proceeding number below or visit http://www.cpuc.ca.gov/documents/ Please contact us at info[at]cleanpowerexhange.org to report any errors or broken links.

Brief Notes:

  • The next CPUC voting meeting is scheduled for January 16 at CPUC headquarters. See AGENDA. For the livestream, click HERE.
  • We continue to monitor wildfire and PG&E bankruptcy-related proceedings but no longer report on those items on a regular basis. We will report occasionally on any significant developments.
  • Significant recent development in bankruptcy proceeding: On December 9, 2019, PG&E reached a $13.5B settlement with wildfire victims. On December 14, Governor Newsom rejected the settlement. How this will be resolved is unclear. Check back for future updates.

Regulatory Proceedings we are monitoring:

  1. SB 1339 Microgrid Rulemaking R.19-09-009
  2. PG&E Safety Culture Investigation 15-08-019
  3. Self Generation Incentive Program (SGIP) R.12-11-005
  4. Power Charge Indifference Adjustment (PCIA)  17-06-026
  5. Resource Adequacy (RA) 17-09-020
  6. Integrated Resource Plans (IRP) 16-02-007
  7. Distribution Resource Plans (DRP) 14-08-013 
  8. Renewables Portfolio Standard (RPS) 18-07-003
  9. Integrated Distributed Energy Resources 4-10-003
  10. SB 790 IOU Code of Conduct 12-02-009
  11. Direct Access 19-03-009
  12. NEM Successor Tariff 14-07-002

Closed proceedings that matter:

  • CCA Rulemaking 03-10-003 – This was the rulemaking that defined all the rules pursuant to AB 117, the original California CCA law
  • CCA Bond and Re-Entry Fees 18-05-022 – This is the proceeding that re-set the bond required to be posted by CCAs in the event that the CCA fails and customers are returned to the incumbent utility

Summaries:

1. SB 1339 Microgrid Rulemaking R.19-09-009

The Climate Center is a Party to this proceeding.

Key Documents:

Recent Developments:

  • December 20, 2019: Scoping Ruling.
  • December 30, 2019: Ruling Directing Respondents to Address Ruling Questions as Part of Their January 21, 2020 Proposal

Next Steps:

  • January 21 – Resiliency proposals due
  • January 30 – Comments on the resiliency proposals due
  • February 6 – Reply comments on resiliency proposals due
  • Summer 2020 – Track 1 concludes.

 

2. PG&E Safety Culture Investigation 15-08-019

The Climate Center is a Party to this proceeding.

Key Documents:

  • June 18 CPUC Order seeking proposals to improve PG&E safety culture
  • July 19 Climate Center Comments

Recent Developments:

  • December 13 – Letter from several LSEs, including a CCA, to CPUC Commissioners expressing interest in taking ownership of PG&E grid assets

Next Steps:

  • May 8, 2020 is the deadline for the conclusion of this investigation; it is not clear what steps may be taken prior to May 8

 

3. Self Generation Incentive Program (SGIP) R.12-11-005

The Climate Center’s filing for Party status was filed on January 3rd, 2020 and is pending.

Key Documents:

Recent Developments:

  • December 19, 2019 – Proposed Decision.  This Decision grants the joint Petition for Modification filed by Southern California Gas Company, Pacific Gas and Electric Company, Southern California Edison Company, and the Center for Sustainable Energy and modifies Decision (D.) 11-09-015 and D.16-06-055 to remove the Self-Generation Incentive Program application fee for residential projects.

Next Steps:

  • January 18, 2020 – Commission heat pump workshop
  • January 31, 2020 – Administrators to submit Tier 1 advice letter containing final SGIP accounting data as of December 31, 2019
  • February 6, 2020 – Earliest possible vote on whether to remove the SGIP application fee for residential projects
  • April 1, 2020 – SGIP modifications effective.

 

4. Power Charge Indifference Adjustment (PCIA)  17-06-026

Recent Developments:

Key Documents:

Next Steps:

  • Q1 2020 – Proposed Decision on Working Group 2 issues
  • Q2 2020 – Resolution of Working Group 3 issues

 

5. Resource Adequacy (RA) 17-09-020

Recent Developments:

  • November 17, 2019 – New RA Proceeding for 2020/2021 R.19-11-009
  • December 23. 2019 – Order granting CalCCA’s request for a stay of D.19-10-021 (Decision Affirming Resource Adequacy Import Rules)

Key Documents:

Background: The RA program is designed to provide adequate electric resources to CAISO to ensure safe and reliable operation of the grid, and to provide appropriate incentives for the siting and construction of new resources needed for reliability. This proceeding has been divided into three Tracks due to the complexity of the issues involved.

 

6. Integrated Resource Plans (IRP) 16-02-007

Recent Developments:

  • January 3, 2020 – Administrative Law Judge’s Final Baseline Ruling finalizing a baseline for purposes of procurement required by Decision 19-11-016

Key Documents:

Background: The IRP proceeding is an umbrella planning proceeding to consider all of the CPUC’s electric procurement policies and programs. The goal is to provide a safe, reliable, and cost-effective electricity supply while complying with SB 350 mandates for LSE energy resource portfolios. LSEs will be required to file individual IRPs, which will then be considered in developing a Preferred System Plan (PSP).

 

7. Distribution Resource Plans (DRP) 14-08-013 

Recent Developments:

  • November 21, 2019: Notice of Reassignment of Commissioner [R.14-08-013, A.15-07-002, A.15-07-003 and A.15-07-006] are being reassigned to President Marybel Batjer
  • November 8, 2019: Administrative Law Judge’s Ruling requesting comments on possible improvements to the 2020 Distribution Investment Deferred Framework process. Opening comments shall be filed and served by January 17, 2020. Reply comments shall be filed and served by January 31, 2020.

Key Documents: See Proceeding

Background: This proceeding consolidates numerous proceedings and seeks to establish policies, procedures, and rules for investor-owned electric utilities (IOUs) to develop Distribution Resources Plan (DRP) Proposals, and to evaluate the IOUs’ infrastructure and planning to incorporating distributed energy resources into their systems. There are 3 parallel and concurrent Tracks in this proceeding. Track 1 concerns methodological issues. Track 2 concerns demonstration and pilot projects. Track 3 concerns policy issues. Track 3 also has 3 Sub-tracks. Although Decisions have been issued on all Tracks, there remain residual issues as well as newly identified issues within the scope of the proceeding.

 

8. Renewables Portfolio Standard (RPS) 18-07-003

New Developments:

  • December 19, 2019: Final Decision on 2019 RPS Plans. (and Proposed Decision on 2019 RPS Plans)
    • CCAs shall demonstrate, describe, and timeline actions necessary for 2019 procurement plan compliance within 30 days of 12/30/19
    • CCAs shall plan for the long-term procurement compliance period 2021-2024
    • CCAs shall furnish the CPUC copies of any contracts they enter into no later than 30 days following the date they intend to serve load, and in no event later than August 1, 2020
    • By March 31, 2020, Energy Division shall initiate stakeholder workshops before filing of the 2020 draft RPS Plans
    • RPS and IRP filings shall be consolidated
    • All LSEs shall analyze the impact of economic curtailment, overgeneration or oversupply events on their individual resource portfolios in their future RPS Procurement Plans
    • PG&E’s Renewable Energy Credit sales framework is approved with modifications. The pricing that PG&E seeks is rejected; PG&E may use its previously approved price floor methodology or the methodology proposed by the Public Advocates Office
    • For 2020, CCAs and Electric Service Providers (ESPs) shall include more granular information regarding planning in the next annual procurement plan cycle, beyond a general statement that they will comply with the Renewables Portfolio Standard requirements and upcoming long-term procurement requirements

 

9. Integrated Distributed Energy Resources 4-10-003

No new developments.

Key Documents:

Background: Since 2007, the Commission has sought to integrate demand-side energy solutions and technologies through utility program offerings. Decision (D.07-10-032) directs that utilities “integrate customer demand-side programs, such as energy efficiency, self-generation, advanced metering, and demand response, in a coherent and efficient manner.” The Commission’s IDER Action Plan published in 2016 remains in draft form.

 

10. SB 790 IOU Code of Conduct 12-02-009

No recent updates.

Key Documents:

January 30 2018 – This proceeding re-emerged as a concern when the IOUs filed a Joint Petition for Modification to the rules imposed on them regarding lobbying against CCAs.

Background: Original CCA law, AB 117 stipulates that IOUs must “cooperate fully” with local governments pursuing Community Choice. In the mid-to-late 2000s, San Francisco, Marin, and the San Joaquin Valley experienced egregious disinformation campaigns waged by the incumbent utility for these jurisdictions against their efforts. The obstruction was documented in a series of California Senate Select Committee on Renewable Energy hearings in 2010 chaired by Senator Mark Leno. The result of the hearings was SB 790, which created an IOU Code of Conduct that prohibits IOUs from marketing against CCAs unless they establish a separate marketing division that does not use ratepayer funds, among other provisions.

 

11. Direct Access 19-03-009

No Recent Updates

Key Documents:

  • March 14, 2019 CPUC issued an Order Instituting Rulemaking (OIR) for proceeding R. 19-03-009 regarding implementation of Senate Bill 237 (SB 237 – Hertzberg) concerning expansion of the Direct Access (DA) program.

Background: DA is available to non-residential customers. Background: DA access was restricted after the energy crisis by SB 1X. DA access is currently capped and accessible via a lottery system, with 7,603 GWh of load on the waitlist. SB 237 increases the maximum total annual kilowatt-hours allowed under the DA program by a total of 4,000 GWh apportioned among the three IOU service territories. That increase must be implemented by June 1, 2019. SB 237 also gives CPUC until June 1, 2020 to provide the legislature with guidance on expanding DA access to all interested non-residential customers. The proceeding will have two phases to address the two mandates.

 

12. Net Energy Metering (NEM) Successor Tariff 14-07-002

No recent updates. The NEM successor tariff had been expected to be initiated in 2019. It wasn’t.

Key Documents:

Background: Pursuant to direction in the NEM Successor Tariff Decision, the Commission was supposed to have reviewed the NEM successor tariff some time in 2019, when the proceedings related to distributed energy resources were to have been completed and after default TOU rates were implemented. Energy Division staff had planned to explore compensation structures for customer-sited distributed generation other than NEM, as well as consider an export compensation rate that takes into account locational and time-differentiated values. On April 26, 2019, the Energy Division distributed a Revised Solar Information Packet to service list R.14-07-002 and R.12-11-005.  The Energy Division asked for written comments about the content of the Revised Solar Information Packet and implementation approach.  The deadlines for submitting written comments has passed. If you have questions contact Kerry Fleisher at the CPUC Energy Division: Kerry.Fleisher@cpuc.ca.gov

Next Steps: Unknown

CPX Legislative Update – January 9, 2020

Welcome to the 2020 legislative session! The Legislature reconvened on Monday, January 6. And away we go! See Utility Dive’s January 8 article predicting a “Wild West” of bills targeting PG&E as a result of their many troubles. Below are some key bills we are tracking. So far it is mostly bills that were held over from the 2019 session. We will be adding new bill numbers as the 2020 session progresses. Please let us know what energy or climate legislation your representative is cooking up! Send us an email to info[at]cleanpowerexchange.org.

AB 56 (Garcia) OPPOSE – This bill will empower the CPUC to order energy procurement based on real or perceived shortcomings in the Integrated Resource Plans submitted by Investor Owned Utilities, Direct Access providers, and CCAs. The bill will allow the CPUC to require procurement on any perceived deficiency that may be 10 to 12 years out in the future. This makes no sense, given that so much lead time would allow a CCA to address any potential problem. Read the Center’s July 2019 Letter of Opposition. STATUS: No committee assignment and no hearing date set.

AB 235 (Mayes) – Now dubbed the “Catastrophic Wildfire Liability Recovery Act,” this bill will allow PG&E to issue bonds to cover 2017, 2018 wildfire liabilities that ratepayers could ultimately have to pay for, and allows the CPUC to arbitrarily set a limit on the amount a transmission & distribution utility must pay as a result of catastrophic wildfire that may have been the result of their infrastructure. It is essentially a defense of status quo corporate utility dominance. STATUS: In the Senate Energy Committee. No hearing scheduled.

AB 1839 (Bonta) – The “Green New Deal” bill. Introduced on January 6, this bill would create the California Green New Deal Council with a specified membership appointed by the Governor. The bill would require the California Green New Deal Council to submit a specified report to the Legislature no later than January 1, 2022. STATUS: No committee staff bill analysis is available, the bill has not been scheduled for a hearing, and we have yet to take a position.

AB 1847 (Levine) – This bill would authorize the CPUC (contingent on the Commission finding that an electrical corporation is not complying with State law, rules, or regulations) to appoint a public administrator to the electrical corporation for a period not to exceed 180 days. The bill would vest the public administrator with oversight authority over the electrical corporation’s activities that impact public safety. See the bill author’s factsheet. STATUS: No committee assignment or hearing as of the date of this update.

SB 246 (Wieckowski) – Read our Support Letter. – This bill, if enacted as written, will impose an oil and gas severance tax on the privilege of extracting oil or fossil gas from the earth or water in California upon any operator engaged in such extraction. Read the bill author’s factsheet. STATUS: Scheduled for a hearing in the Senate Governance and Finance Committee on January 15, 2020.

SB 350 (Hertzberg) OPPOSE – This bill would “authorize the CPUC to consider a multiyear centralized resource adequacy mechanism,” meaning, a central buyer, which would encroach on CCA statutory authority on procurement autonomy. This bill was a tandem bill with AB 56. STATUS: In Senate Energy Committee with no hearing scheduled.

SB 378 (Wiener): Would establish ratepayer protections related to Public Safety Power Shutoff incidents. STATUS: Scheduled for a hearing in the Senate Energy Committee on January 15.

SB 386 (Caballero) – Read our Letter of Opposition. This bill would allow Turlock, Modesto, and Merced Irrigation Districts to count their large hydro assets (dams) toward their Renewable Portfolio Standard (RPS) obligations. This would significantly impact progress with new renewables. These Irrigation Districts will already be able to count their dams as carbon-free pursuant to state policy on decarbonization and mechanisms are in place to protect low-income communities from any cost burdens. STATUS: Scheduled for a hearing in the Senate Energy Committee on January 15, 2020.

SB 702 (Hill) – This bill would amend section 399.13 of the Public Utilities Code to authorize a retail seller of electricity to rely on contracts of 10 years or more in duration or ownership agreements entered into directly by its end-use customer for eligible renewable energy resources located on the customer side of the meter to satisfy the portion of the 65% requirement attributable to the retail sales of that end-use customer. STATUS: Scheduled for a hearing in the Senate Energy Committee on January 15.

SB-772 (Bradford) – OPPOSE – This bill relates to procurement of long duration bulk energy storage. Would require CAISO to procure 2,000MW of long-duration energy storage projects by 2022. Concerns center on forcing the hand of CCA procurement. STATUS: In the Senate committee process with no committee assignment and no hearing date.

SB 774 (Stern) – SB 774 would require IOUs to collaborate with the State’s Office of Emergency of Services and others to identify where back-up electricity sources may provide increased electrical distribution grid resiliency and would allow the IOUs to file applications with the CPUC to invest in, and deploy, microgrids to increase resiliency. Concerns focus on too much control being placed in the hands of the IOUs over microgrid development when other LSEs and stakeholders can and should play a role. STATUS: In the Assembly committee process with no committee assignment and no hearing date.

SB-801 (Glazer, McGuire) Electrical corporations: wildfire mitigation plans: deenergization: public safety protocol. This bill would require an electrical corporation to deploy backup electrical resources or provide financial assistance for backup electrical resources to a customer receiving a medical baseline allowance if the customer meets those conditions.

For a complete list of bills we are tracking, click HERE. We do expect many more bills relating to Community Choice, electricity system resilience, microgrids, the climate crisis, and other related issues to emerge. So expect a lively 2020 session. our next update will be published on January 23.