Transitions at the Clean Power Exchange

Dear Clean Power Exchange subscribers,

Thank you for being a subscriber to The Clean Power Exchange e-news! CPX was created in early 2016 to help build and strengthen the Community Choice Energy movement in California. When we started there were only three CCAs up and running in California. Now, with over 20 operational agencies serving over 11 million customers and a statewide Community Choice association growing in statewide political and regulatory strength, we at The Climate Center, the parent organization of CPX, feel that the CCA ship is sailing strong, and have decided that the purpose of CPX has largely been fulfilled.

First, don’t worry, we are not removing information and features, we are moving them to our main website, theclimatecenter.org where most of the key features of CPX will still be available, including our news and webinar archives, the resources pages, and the interactive map.

CPX e-news will continue to be published until December 10, which will be the last edition as CPX e-news. After December 10, updates and info about CCA activity around the state will be shared in a Climate Center hosted platform. Note: the geographical divisions will be eliminated and we will post the top CCA stories from around the state to all subscribers.

Like CPX, the new CCA news will come out every other week on Thursdays. All CPX subscribers will be automatically subscribed to The Climate Center news. Just like the choice architecture of CCAs, you don’t need to do anything if you want to stay on board. If for whatever reason you would prefer not to keep receiving our e-news, you can opt out at any time with a few mouse clicks.

Some of our accomplishments over the past five years:

  • Built a subscriber base of around 2000
  • Produced over twenty CCA-related webinars
  • Hosted five well-attended Business of Local Energy Symposia between 2014 and 2019 in different parts of the state
  • Served as an informational resource for a wide variety of stakeholders

We invite you to explore The Climate Center website, especially our flagship campaign, Climate Safe California. If you like what you see, we invite you to endorse the Climate Safe California campaign.

More than anything else, all of us on the CPX team and The Climate Center, want to express our deep gratitude to all of our readers, users, subscribers. We’ve appreciated your feedback, suggestions, and guest blogs along the way. So, THANK YOU!

And a hearty thanks to all of our partners and sponsors who have made it possible.

Sincerely,

Woody, Nina, Stacey, Ann, Barry, and Ellie

Peninsula Clean Energy Expands Electric Vehicle Rebate Program

Up to $1,000 rebate covers all new EVs under $45K

REDWOOD CITY, CA – Oct. 1, 2020 – Peninsula Clean Energy is expanding its program offering rebates to help first-time buyers of new electric vehicles.

The 2020 New EV Rebate Program will offer rebates of $1,000 towards the cost of a new fully electric vehicle and $700 for a plug-in hybrid purchased by San Mateo County residents between Oct. 1 through Dec. 31. Eligible vehicles are any new EVs that have a purchase contract cash price of $45,000 or less, before sales tax.

Peninsula Clean Energy is also providing residents the opportunity to experience driving an EV with a $200 rebate toward the rental of an EV and assistance in setting up at-home or at-dealership test drives.

“These rebates will encourage hundreds of new car buyers to choose a cleaner vehicle and also raise awareness and consideration for those who are looking ahead to their next vehicle purchase down the line,” Peninsula Clean Energy CEO Jan Pepper said. “By choosing electric vehicles, we can all help make a sizable dent in transportation-sector greenhouse gas emissions, which is by far the biggest contributor to climate change in San Mateo County, and do our part in helping California’s planned transition from gasoline-powered vehicles.”

The expanded rebate program comes on the heels of California Gov. Gavin Newsom’s call for all new vehicles sold in the state to be zero-emission by 2035.

Applications and other details are available at PenCleanEnergy.com/NewEV.

The 2020 EV Rebate Program expands on programs in 2019 and 2018 to allow San Mateo County residents to purchase from a wider range of vehicle models and from sellers outside of the county, including online sellers.

“Don’t wait. There is already a full-electric EV or plug-in hybrid passenger vehicle that will work for almost everyone,” said Paul Breslow, innovation director at EDF Energy who purchased a new EV as part of the 2019 program.

The 2020 program is limited to San Mateo County residents who have not previously purchased or leased an EV. The rebate is limited to one per person and two per household.

The rebates are part of a larger effort by Peninsula Clean Energy to spur EV use in San Mateo County and provide a model for the expansion of EVs elsewhere. That includes the recent launch of the EV Ready Program, an unprecedented $28 million effort to install EV charging infrastructure at commercial workplaces, multi-family dwellings and other public locations. It is the largest EV charging infrastructure program tied to a single Community Choice Aggregation (CCA) agency and aims to install 3,500 charging ports in San Mateo County over the next four years.

 

About Peninsula Clean Energy

Peninsula Clean Energy is a Community Choice Aggregation agency and the official electricity provider for San Mateo County. Founded in 2016 with a mission to reduce greenhouse gas emissions in the county, the agency serves 295,000 customers by providing more than 3,500 gigawatt hours annually of electricity that is 95% carbon-free and at lower cost than PG&E. As a community-led, not-for-profit agency, Peninsula Clean Energy makes significant investments in our communities to expand access to sustainable and affordable energy solutions. Peninsula Clean Energy is on track to deliver electricity that is 100% carbon-free by 2021 and 100% renewable on a 24/7 basis by 2025. The agency has earned investment grade credit ratings from Moody’s and Fitch.

 

Follow us at PenCleanEnergy.com, on Twitter and Facebook (@PenCleanEnergy) and on LinkedIn.

Media Contact

Darren Goode

Peninsula Clean Energy

dgoode@peninsulacleanenergy.com

(202) 550-6619

School Kids to Breathe easier – Governor Newsom signs AB 841

In a true nail-biter with less than five hours left on the clock for the to sign or veto bills, Governor Newsom signed AB 841, the bill authored by Assemblymember Phil Ting that creates the School Energy Efficiency Stimulus Program. The new law will create a healthier environment for schoolchildren, save energy, create jobs in a time of economic crisis, and provide other direct support to schools and schoolchildren in underserved communities.

AB 841 enjoyed a rare broad and diverse coalition of supporters that included labor, public health, environmental organizations, and others. The Climate Center was proud to be an active member of the Coalition.

“Given our public health crisis and economic hardship, this is the right policy at the right time. AB 841 is a bill that helps provide a healthier indoor environment for our children, and provides quality employment and job training for the labor force performing the Heating, Ventilation, and Air Conditioning (HVAC) upgrades at schools in underserved communities. The Climate Center applauds the Governor, Assemblymember Ting, and the broad coalition that helped get AB 841 across the finish line. We were proud to be a part of it,” said Ellie Cohen, Chief Executive Officer of The Climate Center.

About a week before the deadline, The Climate Center and its Central Valley staff pulled together a letter of support from Central Valley elected leaders. In general The Climate Center participated with the Coalition in getting support letters turned around in short order, talking to offices, social media, and press. The Governor was conflicted and was urged to veto the bill, but the strong coalition used every connection and pressure point possible got the bill across the finish line and it worked. The bill was highly unlikely to be signed if our voices had gone unheard.

AB 841 is a win-win for the health of California students by installing up-to-date plumbing and HVAC systems in schools, starting with those in under-served communities. It also supports clean transportation by putting money into the EV charging infrastructure. No new tax is involved to fund the programs as the money is already available and unused at the California Public Utilities Commission.

In a September 24 OpEd by State Superintendent of Schools Tony Thurmond stated that “This is critical for getting kids and teachers safely back into classrooms. The CDC recommends “ventilation systems operate properly” as a key consideration for school leaders considering reopening. AB 841 addresses that problem. That’s why the bill has the support of schools and teachers, public health experts, labor, business and environmental organizations.” The bill will use idle energy efficiency funds to install and modernize school HVAC systems, will streamline the process for approving public electric vehicle charger projects and will also protect consumers and the public by creating training requirements for workers installing public chargers.

For updates on other bills we tracked in 2020, see our October 1 Legislative Update.

Legislative Update for October 1, 2020

Yesterday was the last day for the Governor to sign bills. Below is a summary of the results of some of the bills we monitored. To save you time, we have only included bills that have been signed by the governor or are still pending on his desk. All other bills previously tracked were withdrawn by the author or died in committee.

For a complete list of the 135 bills we tracked in 2020, click HERE.

Endorse our Climate-Safe California platform HERE.

See our collected position letters HERE.

Assembly Bills

AB 78 (Multiple co-authors) This is a budget trailer bill within the overall 2020-21 budget package necessary to implement actions related to the California Infrastructure Bank (IBank). It establishes a Climate Catalyst Revolving Loan Fund at the IBank to receive funds from non State governmental entities and private sources for the purpose of making loans for climate catalyst projects that further the state’s climate goals. STATUS: Signed by the Governor.

AB 841 (Ting) Supported – Reallocates funds to help upgrade school HVAC systems and advance electric vehicle charging infrastructure.  STATUS: Signed by the Governor. See article about AB 841 in this edition of CPX e-news.

AB 2800 (Quirk) – Creates a Climate Safe Infrastructure Working Group. STATUS: Signed by the Governor.

AB 3214 (Limón) – Supported. Read coalition Letter of Support that The Climate Center’s signed on to. This bill increases existing fines for oil spills. STATUS: Signed by the Governor.

Senate Bills

SB 702 (Hill) – This bill authorizes an electric retail seller the option to rely on the contracts or ownership agreements entered into prior to January 1, 2019, directly by its nonprofit educational institution end-use customer to help satisfy the longterm procurement requirement in the state’s renewable portfolio standard. STATUS: Signed by the Governor.

SB 1320 (Stern) SUPPORT – Directs the Governor’s Office of Planning and Research (OPR), through the Integrated Climate Adaptation and Resiliency Program (ICARP), to complete a California-specific climate change assessment no less frequently than every five years to assess the impacts and risks of climate change and identify potential solutions to inform legislative policy. STATUS: Signed by the Governor.

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Please send suggestions and corrections to woody@theclimatecenter.org

 

Regulatory Update for October 1, 2020

The CPUC is holding its meetings remotely. See the COVID19 information page on the CPUC’s website for more COVID19-related info. Remote meeting notice from CPUC: Pursuant to Executive Order N-29-20, Commissioners may participate in CPUC meetings remotely. The public may observe, provide public comments during the public comment period, and otherwise participate remotely pursuant to the Bagley-Keene Open Meeting Act. To listen or make comments not to exceed three minutes by phone, dial 1-800-857-1917, passcode: 9899501. Alternatively, you mail email brief written comments (which do not exceed three minutes when read aloud) to 10082020VotingMeetingComments@cpuc.ca.gov and the Public Advisor may read your comments out loud to the meeting if time permits. 

Brief Notes:

  • We are no longer providing updates on proceedings to which The Climate Center is not a Party. Links to proceedings that are important to advancing local clean energy are included. To find updates, click on the proceeding number which will bring you to that proceeding docket.
  • The next CPUC voting meeting takes place on October 8 @ 10am. See AGENDA. For the livestream, click HERE.

Proceedings we are tracking

Below is a numbered list of the regulatory proceedings we are tracking, followed by a brief summary of background information, new or recent developments, and Climate Center filings, if any, for each of the proceedings. The following summaries are intended as very brief highlights of selected key actions and activities. For details on any of these proceedings, we suggest logging in to the relevant proceeding page on the CPUC’s website. An expedient way to do that is to click on the proceeding number below or visit CPUC’s Documents Page. Please contact us at info[at]cleanpowerexhange.org to report any errors or broken links.

Proceedings to which The Climate Center is a Party:

  1. SB 1339 Microgrid Rulemaking 19-09-009
  2. PG&E Safety Culture Investigation 15-08-019

Important Proceedings (not updated here):

  1. Self Generation Incentive Program (SGIP) 12-11-005
  2. Power Charge Indifference Adjustment (PCIA)  17-06-026
  3. Resource Adequacy (RA) 17-09-020
  4. Integrated Resource Plans (IRP) 16-02-007
  5. Renewables Portfolio Standard (RPS) 18-07-003
  6. Integrated Distributed Energy Resources 4-10-003
  7. NEM Successor Tariff 14-07-002

Summaries:

  1. Microgrid Rulemaking 19-09-009 pursuant to SB 1339 (Stern, 2018)

The Climate Center is a Party to this proceeding.

Recent Developments:

  • Sept 25 – The Climate Center and Vote Solar Joint Filing on alternatives to diesel back-up generators (BUGs)
  • Sept. 4 – Assigned Commissioner and ALJ’s Ruling Seeking Comment on Policy Questions and an Interim Approach for Minimizing Emissions from Generation During Transmission Outages. Comments due Sept. 25.
  • August 28 Climate Center/Vote Solar Joint Reply Comments, Track 2
  • August 14 – The Climate Center and Vote Solar Joint Comments on Track 2 Ruling

The Commission did not reject use of diesel fuel as a near-term back up generation choice. However, with this Decision in place it should become easier for local governments to access the data they need to engage in Community Energy Resilience planning, part of The Climate Center’s Climate-Safe California campaign.

Key Documents:

  • July 3 Scoping Ruling – Assigned Commissioner’s Amended Scoping Memo and Ruling for Track 2.
  • June 11 Decision adopting Short-Term (Track 1) Actions to Accelerate Microgrid Deployment and Related Resiliency Solutions.
  • The Climate Center and Vote Solar Opening Comments filed on May 19 and Reply Comments, filed on May 26.
  • April 29 – Proposed Decision Adopting Short-Term Actions to Accelerate Microgrid Deployment and Related Resiliency Solutions. A special note here: This Proposed CPUC Decision reflects a formal embrace by the CPUC of several key ACE principles that The Climate Center and partner organizations have been advocating for regarding the pivotal role of local governments.
  • March 19 – The Climate Center participated in an Ex Parte communication with CPUC staff
  • January 30 – Climate Center Opening Comments in the Track 1 Proceeding
  • December 20, 2019: Scoping Ruling.
  • October 21, 2019: The Climate Center Opening Comments.
  • September 19, 2019: Order Instituting Rulemaking.

Next Steps: Track 2 for longer term measures has begun.

 

2. PG&E Safety Culture Investigation 15-08-019

The Climate Center is a Party to this proceeding.

Recent Developments:

  • Sept. 4, 2020 – Administrative Law Judge’s Ruling Updating Case Status. Investigation 15-08-019 will remain open. NorthStar Consulting Group, Inc. will continue its work in a monitoring role. Issues to be address in the proceeding may be raised by parties or the Commission.
  • January 23, 2020 – Motion of the Ad Hoc Committee of Senior Unsecured Note-holders of PG&E to Withdraw
  • December 13 – Letter from several LSEs, including a CCA, to CPUC Commissioners expressing interest in taking ownership of PG&E grid assets

Key Documents:

  • June 18, 2019 CPUC Order seeking proposals to improve PG&E safety culture
  • July 19, 2019 Climate Center Opening Comments

Next Steps:

  • May 8, 2020 was the deadline for the conclusion of this investigation, however, the ALJ has announced that the investigation will remain open.

 

Closed proceedings that matter:

  • CCA Rulemaking 03-10-003– This was the rulemaking that defined all the rules pursuant to AB 117, the original California CCA law
  • CCA Bond and Re-Entry Fees 18-05-022– This is the proceeding that re-set the bond required to be posted by CCAs in the event that the CCA fails and customers are returned to the incumbent utility

 

 

Regulatory Update for September 17, 2020

The CPUC is holding its meetings remotely. See the COVID19 information page on the CPUC’s website for more COVID19-related info. Remote meeting notice from CPUC:

Pursuant to Executive Order N-29-20, Commissioners may participate in CPUC meetings remotely. The public may observe, provide public comments during the public comment period, and otherwise participate remotely pursuant to the Bagley-Keene Open Meeting Act.

  • To listen or make comments not to exceed three minutes by phone, dial 1-800-857-1917, passcode: 9899501
  • Alternatively, you mail email brief written comments (which do not exceed three minutes when read aloud) to 09242020VotingMeetingComments@cpuc.ca.gov and the Public Advisor may read your comments out loud to the meeting if time permits. 

Brief Notes:

  • The next CPUC voting meeting takes place on Sept. 24 @ 10am. See AGENDA. For the livestream, click HERE.

Updates on proceedings we are tracking

Below is a numbered list of the regulatory proceedings we are tracking, followed by a brief summary of background information, new or recent developments, and Climate Center filings, if any, for each of the proceedings.

Note that the following summaries are intended as very brief highlights of selected key actions and activities. For details on any of these proceedings, we suggest logging in to the relevant proceeding page on the CPUC’s website. An expedient way to do that is to click on the proceeding number below or visit CPUC’s Documents Page. Please contact us at info[at]cleanpowerexhange.org to report any errors or broken links.

  1. SB 1339 Microgrid Rulemaking 19-09-009
  2. Self Generation Incentive Program (SGIP) 12-11-005
  3. Power Charge Indifference Adjustment (PCIA)  17-06-026
  4. Resource Adequacy (RA) 17-09-020
  5. Integrated Resource Plans (IRP) 16-02-007
  6. Renewables Portfolio Standard (RPS) 18-07-003
  7. Integrated Distributed Energy Resources 4-10-003
  8. NEM Successor Tariff 14-07-002

Closed proceedings that matter:

  • CCA Rulemaking 03-10-003– This was the rulemaking that defined all the rules pursuant to AB 117, the original California CCA law
  • CCA Bond and Re-Entry Fees 18-05-022– This is the proceeding that re-set the bond required to be posted by CCAs in the event that the CCA fails and customers are returned to the incumbent utility

Summaries:

  1. Microgrid Rulemaking 19-09-009 pursuant to SB 1339 (Stern, 2018)

Recent Developments:

  • Sept. 4 – Assigned Commissioner and ALJ’s Ruling Seeking Comment on Policy Questions and an Interim Approach for Minimizing Emissions from Generation During Transmission Outages. Comments due Sept. 25.
  • August 28 Climate Center/Vote Solar Joint Reply Comments, Track 2
  • August 14 – The Climate Center and Vote Solar Joint Comments on Track 2 Ruling
  • July 3 Scoping Ruling – Assigned Commissioner’s Amended Scoping Memo and Ruling for Track 2.
  • June 11 Decision adopting Short-Term (Track 1) Actions to Accelerate Microgrid Deployment and Related Resiliency Solutions. The Climate Center is a Party to this proceeding.

The Commission did not reject use of diesel fuel as a near-term back up generation choice. However, with this Decision in place it should become easier for local governments to access the data they need to engage in Community Energy Resilience planning, part of The Climate Center’s Climate-Safe California campaign.

Key Documents:

  • The Climate Center and Vote Solar Opening Comments filed on May 19 and Reply Comments, filed on May 26.
  • April 29 – Proposed Decision Adopting Short-Term Actions to Accelerate Microgrid Deployment and Related Resiliency Solutions. A special note here: This Proposed CPUC Decision reflects a formal embrace by the CPUC of several key ACE principles that The Climate Center and partner organizations have been advocating for regarding the pivotal role of local governments.
  • March 19 – The Climate Center participated in an Ex Parte communication with CPUC staff
  • January 30 – Climate Center Opening Comments in the Track 1 Proceeding
  • December 20, 2019: Scoping Ruling.
  • October 21, 2019: The Climate Center Opening Comments.
  • September 19, 2019: Order Instituting Rulemaking.

Next Steps: Track 2 for longer term measures has begun.


  1. Self-Generation Incentive Program (SGIP)

Recent Developments:

  • There is currently no open SGIP proceeding.
  • May 7, 2020:  The Energy Division held part two of the workshop webinar on how to include heat pump water heaters in SGIP.  The final presentations are available here.
  • April 1 – The application window for the new SGIP incentives levels opened, following up on the CPUC’s Decision in January (see below) authorizing adding funds to SGIP’s energy storage budgets. Of particular note, the newly-created Equity Resiliency Budget ($513M) provides enhanced SGIP incentives for on-site residential and non-residential storage systems for low-income, vulnerable customers in high-risk fire threat districts (HFTD) or those who have been affected by PSPS events. The new SGIP Decision also created a $0.15/Wh resiliency adder for non-residential customers with critical resilience needs such as police stations, fire stations, hospitals, etc. Additional information is available in the new SGIP Handbook.

Next Steps: A new proceeding is expected to be opened in late 2020.

Key Documents:


  1. Power Charge Indifference Adjustment (PCIA) 17-06-026

Recent Developments:

  • June 30, 2020 – Decision Adopting a Framework and Evaluation Criteria for the PCIA Prepayment Agreements. Opening comments, which shall not exceed 15 pages, were due July 20, 2020. Reply comments, which shall not exceed 5 pages, are due 5 days after the last day for filing comments.
  • June 22 – Protect Our Communities Foundation in San Diego is challenging the PCIA in state appellate court in San Diego. We will continue to provide updates on this case as it proceeds.

Next Steps:

  • Q2 2020 – Resolution of Working Group 3 issues

Key Documents:


  1. Resource Adequacy (RA) 17-09-020 and 19-11-009

Recent Developments:

  • August 7, 2020 – Administrative Law Judge’s Ruling on Energy Division’s Track 3.B Proposal.
  • July 7, 2020 – Assigned Commissioner’s Amended Track 3.A and 3.B Scoping Memo and Ruling.
  • June 11 – Decision empowering PG&E and SCE to have procurement authority over RA for CCAs.  This is a very bad decision that impinges on the statutory right of CCAs to procure electricity for their customers. Designating PG&E and SCE as central procurement entities for RA creates a situation where for-profit IOUs that are directly in competition with not-for-profit CCAs for customers, get to procure electricity for the CCA and charge them for costs.
  • May 22, 2020 – Proposed Decision issued adopting local capacity obligations for 2021-2023, adopting flexible capacity for 2021, and refining the RA program.

Next Steps:

Key Documents:

  • Track 1: Revisions to RA import rules
  • Track 2: 2021 System and Flex RA. 2021-2023 Local RA
  • Track 3: Structural changes to RA program
  • Track 4: 2022 System and Flex RA. 2022-2024 Local RA
  • October 2017 – Order Instituting Rulemaking

Background: The RA program is designed to provide adequate electric resources to CAISO to ensure safe and reliable operation of the grid, and to provide appropriate incentives for the siting and construction of new resources needed for reliability. This proceeding has been divided into three Tracks due to the complexity of the issues involved.


  1. Integrated Resource Plans (IRP) 16-02-007

Recent Developments:

  • May 26, 2020 – Proposed Decision Granting Intervenor Compensation to Friends of the Earth for Substantial Contribution to Decision 19-04-040 and Decision 18-02-018. Opening Comments, which shall not exceed 15 pages, are due no later than June 15, 2020. Reply Comments, which shall not exceed 5 pages, are due 5 days after the last day for filing Opening Comments.
  • May 20, 2020 – Administrative Law Judge’s Ruling Correcting April 15, 2020 Ruling Finalizing Load Forecasts and Greenhouse Gas Benchmarks for Individual 2020 Integrated Resource Plan Filings.
  • April 6, 2020 – Decision 20-03-26 adopts an optimal portfolio, known as the Reference System Portfolio (RSP), to be used by all load-serving entities (LSEs) required to file individual integrated resource plans (IRPs) in 2020.
  • January 3, 2020 – Administrative Law Judge’s Final Baseline Ruling finalizing a baseline for purposes of procurement required by Decision 19-11-016

Next Steps:

Key Documents:

Background: The IRP proceeding is an umbrella planning proceeding to consider all of the CPUC’s electric procurement policies and programs. The goal is to provide a safe, reliable, and cost-effective electricity supply while complying with SB 350 mandates for LSE energy resource portfolios. LSEs will be required to file individual IRPs, which will then be considered in developing a Preferred System Plan (PSP).


  1. Renewables Portfolio Standard (RPS) 18-07-003

Recent Developments:

  • June 26, 2020 – Assigned Commissioner’s and Assigned Administrative Law Judge’s Ruling seeking comment on proposed modification to the Renewable Market Adjusting Tariff program. Comments due by July 21, 2020.
  • May 13 – E-mail Ruling Modifying Schedule of Review for 2020 RPS Procurement Plans Issued in the May 6, 2020 RPS Plan Ruling
  • February 27, 2020 – Ruling on confidentiality rules for the RPS program.

Key Documents:

Background: The RPS proceeding implements Senate Bills 350 (2015) and 100 (2018) that requires all load serving entities to increase their procurement of renewable power to 33% 2020, 44% by 2024, 52% by 2027, and 60% by 2030. The current proceeding is the successor to R.15-02-020.


  1. Integrated Distributed Energy Resources 4-10-003

Recent developments: None at this time

Key Documents:

Background: Since 2007, the Commission has sought to integrate demand-side energy solutions and technologies through utility program offerings. Decision (D.07-10-032) directs that utilities “integrate customer demand-side programs, such as energy efficiency, self-generation, advanced metering, and demand response, in a coherent and efficient manner.” The Commission’s IDER Action Plan published in 2016 remains in draft form.


  1. Net Energy Metering (NEM) Successor Tariff 14-07-002

Recent Updates:

  • The NEM 3.0 proceeding has been initiated
  • August 14 2020 – OIR Issued for NEM 3.0
  • August 14 2020 – The “Lookback Report” on the results of NEM 2.0 produced by Itron

Key Documents:

Background: The current NEM program was adopted by the CPUC in Decision (D.)16-01-044 on January 28, 2016 and is available to customers of PG&E, SCE and SDG&E.  The current NEM program went into effect in SDG&E’s service territory on June 29, 2016, in PG&E’s service territory on December 15, 2016, and in SCE’s service territory on July 1, 2017.  The program provides customer-generators full retail rate credits for energy exported to the grid and requires them to pay a few charges that align NEM customer costs more closely with non-NEM customer costs.

City of Los Banos in Merced County Moves Forward on Community Choice Energy!

The City of Los Banos in the Central Valley’s Merced County voted on September 16 to embark on a process of joining the San Mateo County CCA joint powers authority Peninsula Clean Energy. PCE’s relationship with Los Banos was sparked initially by the location of the 200 megawatt Wright Solar array that broke ground in 2018 and is now operating.

The plan going forward is to file an amended Implementation Plan before the end of the year in order to lunch service to Los Banos residents and businesses in 2022.

 

CalCCA sends recommendations to Governor Newsom about Grid Reliability

On September 9 the California Community Choice Association (CalCCA) sent a letter to Governor Newsom outlining recommendations regarding grid reliability. The letter, outlined in this news release, requests that the Governor take immediate action to improve the reliability of the state’s electric system, and to initiate longer term processes for improving reliability.

In addition to asserting that California should begin to take steps to increase reliability through action in the regulatory, legislative, and federal arenas, CalCCA’s more specific recommendations include:

  • The governor appoint an Independent Review Panel to consider the results of a root-cause investigation of the conditions that led CAISO to initiate rotating outages on Aug. 14 and 15;
  • The CPUC should continue to ensure adequate supplies will be in place for summer 2021 requirements and beyond through the procurement track of the Integrated Resource Planning (IRP) process and review its import restrictions in the context of the recent emergency events;
  • The CPUC should also use the IRP process to refine needs for the 2024-2026 timeframe. CalCCA supported the CPUC’s 3,300-megawatt (MW) procurement order in 2019 and recommends analysis to identify any incremental near-term procurements beyond the current 3,300 MW order;
  • CalCCA also recommends using the IRP process in the coming months to “better refine” technical needs, such as capacity, energy, and evening ramp resources, and to establish a fair process to allocate those resources to load serving entities for procurement action;
  • The CPUC should develop a deeper understanding of import resource availability and institutional barriers to securing firm import resources and provide incentives and regulations for customer-side-of-the-meter infrastructure to act as supply-side energy and capacity resources;
  • The state’s legislature should enact the provisions of AB 3014, a bill that failed to be enacted in the immediate past legislative session, which would establish a Central Reliability Authority responsible for planning and coordinating the state’s resource adequacy with CAISO and, where necessary, procuring backstop supply;
  • Support the expansion of the federal Investment Tax Credit to standalone energy storage resources and the removal of charging restrictions currently limiting the flexibility of battery energy storage to support the state’s ramping and peak needs.

For more information visit CalCCA.

 

 

Legislative Update for September 17, 2020

The Governor has until September 30 to sign or veto bills. Below is a summary of the results of some of the bills we monitored. To save you time, we have only included bills that have been signed by the governor or are still pending on his desk. All other bills died in committee.


For a complete list of the 135 bills we tracked in 2020, click HERE.

Endorse our Climate-Safe California platform HERE.

See our collected position letters HERE.


Assembly Bills

AB 78 (Multiple co-authors) This is a budget trailer bill within the overall 2020-21 budget package necessary to implement actions related to the California Infrastructure Bank (IBank). It establishes a Climate Catalyst Revolving Loan Fund at the IBank to receive funds from non State governmental entities and private sources for the purpose of making loans for climate catalyst projects that further the state’s climate goals. These moneys are available for expenditure upon appropriation by the Legislature. The Strategic Growth Council will advise the Legislature on categories to fund and a report on the projects funded would be prepared annually.  STATUS: Signed by the Governor.

AB 841 (Ting) Supported – Reallocates funds to help upgrade school HVAC systems and advance electric vehicle charging infrastructure.  STATUS: On the Governor’s desk awaiting signature.

AB 2800 (Quirk) – Creates a Climate Safe Infrastructure Working Group. STATUS: On the Governor’s desk.

AB 3214 (Limón) – Supported. Read coalition Letter of Support that The Climate Center’s signed on to. This bill increases existing fines for oil spills. STATUS: On the Governor’s desk awaiting signature.

Senate Bills

SB 1320 (Stern) SUPPORT – Directs the Governor’s Office of Planning and Research (OPR), through the Integrated Climate Adaptation and Resiliency Program (ICARP), to complete a California-specific climate change assessment no less frequently than every five years to assess the impacts and risks of climate change and identify potential solutions to inform legislative policy. STATUS: On the Governor’s desk, awaiting signature.

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Please send suggestions and corrections to woody@theclimatecenter.org

$35 Million Electric Vehicle Charging Station Incentive Project Launches in Santa Clara County

Details now available on how to apply for rebates provided by local municipal utilities, Community Choice Aggregators, and the California Energy Commission

Santa Clara County, Calif. – Starting December 16, 2020, businesses, commercial property owners, and multifamily residences in Santa Clara County can apply for significant rebates to pay for equipment and installation costs for eligible electric vehicle (EV) chargers.

This opportunity is available through a partnership with the California Electric Vehicle Infrastructure Project (CALeVIP). Participants can receive up to $480,000 per site for Direct Current Fast Charging (DCFC) stations and up to $120,000 per site for Level 2 (L2) charging stations.

Today, CALeVIP launched a new website specific to the Peninsula-Silicon Valley Incentive Project to help interested participants prepare for the application process, which opens on December 16. The new website provides specifics on eligibility requirements and eligible equipment costs, summarizes the application process, and provides a list of frequently asked questions. Project funding is expected to be in high demand, so applicants are encouraged to prepare ahead of time and apply quickly.

The City of Palo Alto Utilities, San José Clean Energy, Silicon Valley Clean Energy, and Silicon Valley Power are invested in expanding EV charging accessibility in the region. Together, the local agencies and California Energy Commission are offering $35 million in funding for Santa Clara County. As more Californians choose to drive EVs and the state transitions to an electric transportation system, there is a continued need for available charging stations. This is especially the case in Silicon Valley, which has the highest rate of EV sales in the state.

“Providing better access to charging stations will help accelerate EV adoption and our County’s transition to a cleaner, electric transportation system,” said Supervisor Susan Ellenberg, Santa Clara County Board Supervisor and SVCE Board Director. “Powering cars with electricity rather than fossil fuels reduces local air pollution and climate-changing carbon emissions from tailpipes.”

The Peninsula-Silicon Valley Incentive Project will help Santa Clara County reduce greenhouse gas emissions from the transportation sector, the leading source of emissions in Silicon Valley.

“After sellout successes in other parts of the state, the Energy Commission is proud to fund this new CALeVIP project and bring the latest EV charging technology to Santa Clara and San Mateo counties,” said Commissioner Patty Monahan. “Working with local partners ensures infrastructure is installed in where it’s needed most to help all Californians take part in our clean energy future.”

CALeVIP works to address regional needs for EV charging infrastructure throughout California, while supporting the state’s goals to improve air quality, fight climate change and reduce petroleum use. The Santa Clara County investments are part of a regional Peninsula-Silicon Valley Incentive Project that totals $55 million in incentive funding ($35 million in Santa Clara County and $20 million in San Mateo County).

CALeVIP has several other regional projects throughout the state, including projects in San Joaquin Valley, Sacramento County and Southern California. CALeVIP and its regional projects are implemented by the Center for Sustainable Energy and funded primarily by the Energy Commission’s Clean Transportation Program (also known as the Alternative and Renewable Fuel and Vehicle Technology Program).

The incentive project will help increase the number of fast chargers and L2 chargers in public, workplace and multifamily housing locations, as well as along highway corridors. Fast chargers provide at least 100 miles of range per hour of charging, and some can charge a battery up to 80 percent in 30 minutes. L2 chargers provide 15-35 miles of range per hour of charging, which is enough for most day-to-day driving.

More information about agency-specific investments in electric transportation is available at the following links:

  • About the City of Palo Alto Utilities (CPAU)

    The City of Palo Alto is the only municipality in California operating a full suite of utility services including electric, fiber optics, natural gas, water and wastewater, along with refuse and storm drain public works services. Since 2013, the City’s electric supply portfolio has been carbon neutral. For more about CPAU’s EV programs, visit cityofpaloalto.org/EV.

    About San José Clean Energy

    San José Clean Energy is the new electricity generation service provider for residents and businesses in the City of San José, operated by the City’s Community Energy Department. Governed by the City Council, it provides over 330,000 residential and commercial electricity customers with cleaner, lower carbon power options at competitive prices, from sources like solar, wind and hydropower. For more information, please visit www.SanJoseCleanEnergy.org.

    Follow us on FacebookTwitter and Instagram @SJCleanEnergy.

    About Silicon Valley Clean Energy

    Silicon Valley Clean Energy is a not-for-profit community-owned agency serving the majority of Santa Clara County communities, acquiring clean, carbon-free electricity on behalf of more than 270,000 residential and commercial customers. As a public agency, net revenues are returned to the community to keep rates competitive and promote clean energy programs. Member jurisdictions include Campbell, Cupertino, Gilroy, Los Altos, Los Altos Hills, Los Gatos, Milpitas, Monte Sereno, Morgan Hill, Mountain View, Saratoga, Sunnyvale and unincorporated Santa Clara County. SVCE is guided by a Board of Directors, which is comprised of a representative from the governing body of each member community. For more information, please visit SVCleanEnergy.org.

    About Silicon Valley Power

    Silicon Valley Power (SVP) is the trademark adopted for use by the not-for-profit electric municipal utility of Santa Clara, CA, serving residents and businesses for over 120 years. SVP provides power to nearly 55,000 customers, at rates 25 to 48 percent below neighboring communities. SVP is the only full service, vertically integrated publicly owned utility in Silicon Valley owning generation, transmission and distribution assets.

    See more at: www.siliconvalleypower.com. Follow us on FacebookTwitter and LinkedIn.

About the California Energy Commission

The California Energy Commission is leading the state to a 100 percent clean energy future. It has seven core responsibilities: developing renewable energy, transforming transportation, increasing energy efficiency, investing in energy innovation, advancing state energy policy, certifying thermal power plants, and preparing for energy emergencies.

About the Center for Sustainable Energy

The Center for Sustainable Energy® (CSE) is a nonprofit offering clean energy program administration and technical advisory services. With the experience and streamlined efficiency of a for-profit operation, CSE leads with the passion and heart of a nonprofit. We work nationwide with energy policymakers, regulators, public agencies, businesses and others as an expert implementation partner and trusted resource. EnergyCenter.org

Media Contacts

City of Palo Alto Utilities
Catherine Elvert
Utilities Communications Manager
catherine.elvert@cityofpaloalto.org
(650) 329-2417

San José Clean Energy
Zachary Struyk
Deputy Director, Account Management and Marketing
zachary.struyk@sanjoseca.gov
(408) 535-4868

Silicon Valley Clean Energy
Pamela Leonard
Communications Manager
pamela.leonard@svcleanenergy.org
(408) 721-5301 x1004

Silicon Valley Power
Kathleen Hughes
Sr. Division Manager – Customer Engagement
khughes@svpower.com
(408) 615-6632

California Energy Commission
Lindsay Buckley
lindsay.buckley@energy.ca.gov
(916) 654-4989

Center for Sustainable Energy
Chuck Colgan
chuck.colgan@energycenter.org
(858) 244-1184