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US West = EV Adoption Champion In USA

It’s widely known that California is the center of US electric vehicle adoption. California leads the country in terms of overall electric vehicle (EV) sales as well as EV market share of new vehicle sales. It’s also where Tesla was born and where nearly every US EV startup pops up.

But there are other states that are also well ahead of the US average for EV market share … and they’re basically all in the west. (Washington, D.C., is also in the top 10 if you want to include it in this ranking.)

Experian Automotive collected state-by-state data on EV sales and overall auto sales, and what it found is that only 6 states and D.C. had higher EV market share than the US as a whole. That highlights just how much a handful of states carry the country in terms of electric vehicle adoption. The above-average leaders, based on auto sales from the first half of the year, were:

  1. California — 3.6%
  2. Washington — 2.8%
  3. Hawaii — 2.21%
  4. Oregon — 1.7%
  5. Washington, D.C. — 1.48%
  6. Colorado — 1.3%
  7. Arizona — 1.2%

Note that the US EV market share for the first half of the year was 0.9%.

It will be interesting to see how these numbers shift in the second half of the year and next year. EV market share in California rose to 4.1% by the end of the 3rd quarter.

One topic that pops into mind looking at all of the data is EV availability. Automakers sell electric cars in California because they have to. Incentives are relatively strong in other top EV states, but the bigger matter is probably availability. Tesla sells its vehicles to customers all over the country, and you can probably find Nissan LEAFs on dealership lots all over the country as well, but many EVs are available only in California and a few other states. It’s pretty hard to buy electric cars in Alabama if dealers aren’t selling them, ya know?

Aside from exploring state data, Experian dove into cities. The top metro areas (“designated market areas”) in terms of EV market share were:

  1. San Francisco Oakland San Jose (California) — 7.9%
  2. San Diego (California) — 4%
  3. Juneau (Alaska) — 3.5%
  4. Seattle Tacoma (Washington) — 3.4%
  5. Santa Barbara (California) — 2.9%
  6. Monterey Salinas (California) — 2.9%
  7. Los Angeles (California) — 2.8%
  8. Honolulu (Hawaii) — 2.2%
  9. Portland (Oregon) — 2%
  10. Sacramento Stockton Modesto (California) — 1.8%

The next 10 were: Denver, Eugene, Palm Springs, Phoenix, Eureka, Austin, Washington DC, Atlanta, Charlottesville, and Bend. The only cities in that list not in the west are Austin (Texas), Washington (DC), Atlanta (Georgia), and Charlottesville (Virginia).

It’s interesting that Tesla’s birthplace is #1 on this list as well, which I assume has to be in part due to Tesla’s presence and influence in the area.

A key matter for the market growth of electric vehicles is word of mouth. Friends don’t let friends drive gasmobiles! The leading cities and states above will likely see their EV adoption grow exponentially (as we’ve seen in Norway over the past several years). For the foundation of EV sales growth, the big matter is just getting electric cars into the area and getting adoption off the ground.

Strong state incentives, consumer awareness organizations or campaigns, and EV dealerships could all help a great deal with that — as can the Tesla Model 3 and Model Y. Before putting everything on Tesla’s shoulders, though, something you might want to consider is what role you could play for quicker EV uptake in your area. There are organizations waiting to be formed, policies waiting to be drafted, and commercials waiting to be produced. Remember — ask not what your community can do for you, but what you can do for your community!

If you want to get involved politically to promote EV uptake, be sure to check out our Cleantech Revolution initiative and put your name in the hat.

And by the way, the three paragraphs above apply to people in California too. It’s easy to conclude that California is doing well, but 3.6–4.1% EV market share is still pretty lame, and far less than is needed. The state suffers from poor air quality that is largely due to dirty transport. It faces tremendous risk from climate disruption. And it benefits economically from a shift away from fossil transport. The home of Tesla should be sporting 100% EV market, 70% EV market share, or at least 30% EV market share. One out of every 24 auto sales is totally meh.

Any other takeaway thoughts from the data?

 

US West = EV Adoption Champion In USA, by Zachary Shahan, Clean Coalition, December 2, 2018.

10% Of New Vehicles Purchased in California Are EVs

Trends in the US often start in California, expand to other Western states and/or Northeastern states, and then fill in eventually in the Midwest and South. This same pattern is also occurring with sales of EVs in the US and is creating in essence green versus brown states, similar to our political division of blue versus red states.

In August, 1 out of 10 (9.90%) new vehicles purchased in the state of California were EVs (PHEVs + BEVs), according to the latest numbers from the Alliance of Automobile Manufacturers Advanced Technology Vehicle Sales Dashboard (information provided by IHS Market)West Virginia came in last at 0.17%, meaning Californians purchased EVs in August at a rate 58.2 times greater than the state that has become heavily associated with the coal industry in recent years.

Jan-Aug EV Sales Market Share - California

While the 9.90% for August* is the highest market share for sales of new EVs ever in California, the month of September should be even higher due to a significant number of deliveries of the Tesla Model 3 that month. Doing some estimating using September EV sales numbers (which were estimated to be significantly higher than in October), the September market share could come in around 12% for California. (*Note: The Advanced Technology Vehicle Sales Dashboard data is updated about every 2 months, hence August is the most current data available.)

Year-to-date (January through August), California’s EV sales market share stood at 7.07%, nearly double that of the state of Washington at 3.65% and 4.3 times the US total of 1.66%. If you exclude total vehicle and EV sales from California, then the EV market share YTD for the rest of the US would be under 1% at 0.93%.

Top 12 States Jan-Aug 2018 EV Sales Market Share

For the month of August, after California other top states (and DC) for EV sales market share include Oregon (4.12%), Washington (3.54%), District of Columbia (3.40%), Hawaii (2.69%), and Colorado and Arizona (2.46%). The total US market share stood at 2.24% for the month. (If you’d like to play with the data, I’ve created a sortable table here with EV sales numbers by state for 2016 and 2017 and within state sales market share for 2017 and the month of August 2018.)

EV Marketshare August 2018 Top 10 Bottom 5 States

The bottom 5 states were West Virginia (0.17%), Oklahoma (0.20%), Mississippi (0.28%), North Dakota (0.29%), and Louisiana (0.33%).

For the entire year of 2018, the US EV sales market share will likely come close to 2.00% and California should end up between 8.5% to 9%. However, the last 3 months of 2018 for California should average well above 10%. At this rate, California could “cross the EV chasm” (16% of new vehicle sales) at some point during 2020.

California EV Sales as a % of Total New Vehicle Sales-EVAdoption

As I shared in my analysis and article New Models Drive Majority Of US Plug-In Vehicle Sales Growth, Analysis Shows, over the years the vast majority of sales growth comes from the introduction of new EV models into the market. In fact, without sales of the Tesla Model 3, US EV sales year-to-date would be up only about 16,000 units or an increase of approximately 10% versus nearly 74% with the Model 3. And if you factor in nearly 14,000 in sales of the Honda Clarity PHEV YTD, US EV sales YOY would be nearly flat.

With the new EV model impact in mind, the following are factors that will likely help or hinder continued strong growth in EV sales in California over the next few years:

Gas prices: If the price of gas rises above $4 a gallon in California for an extended period, you could see a lot consumers make the switch to a PHEV or BEV, especially by those with long daily commutes to and from work.

Phaseout of the Federal EV tax credit for Tesla and GM: I don’t expect the phaseout of the tax credit to impact sales of Tesla models much. However, GM’s Bolt and Volt could be hurt fairly significantly, with many consumers opting for the Honda Clarity PHEV and Toyota Prius Prime over the Volt, and Hyundai Kona and Kia Niro BEVs over the Bolt.

California Assembly Bill AB1184: If state bill AB1184 passes in 2019, it could establish a $3 billion fund to support the adoption of EVs with larger and instant rebates, more programs for low-income buyers, and the deployment of more charging stations. This program could especially give a boost to sales of EVs priced under $40,000.

Stock Market/Housing Market: California’s economy continues to be strong, ranking as the 5th largest in the world if the state were a country, but a significant downturn in the stock market or housing prices could dissuade many consumers from opting for a more expensive EV for their next auto purchase.

Tesla Model Y: The upcoming crossover version based on the Model 3 is ideal for the California market. It will be perfect for the active outdoor lifestyle of many Californians, and it will replace the now passé Toyota Prius and then the Model 3, as the ultimate way to signal to your neighbors that you are indeed green. Once the Model Y is widely available it could easily become the top selling vehicle overall in California.

Other New EV Models: I expect the upcoming Hyundai Kona and Kia Niro BEVs to sell well in California, but I don’t expect them to be huge sellers. Many Californians (of which I have been one my entire life) can be brand snobs, and at least in recent years have tended to prefer Japanese brands, US-made trucks and SUVs and European luxury cars.

I actually expect the rumored Ford Escape Energi PHEV to be a huge hit in California, assuming it is priced right and has a decent electric range of at least 25-30 miles (or more). Finally, the upcoming luxury SUVs/CUVs from Jaguar, Audi, Mercedes-Benz, and BMW should do well in the Golden State, adding perhaps a combined 50,000 units sold per year.

Top 5 States - Total % of EV Sales - August 2018

Accounting for more than 53% of all EVs sold in the US in August (50.4% YTD), California is clearly driving the country toward mass adoption of electric vehicles. The only question is: How long it will take for most of the rest of the country to catch up?

 

10% Of New Vehicles Purchased in California Are EVs, by Loren McDonald, Clean Technica, November 12, 2018.

PG&E Proposes Ditching Demand Charges for Commercial EV Charging

Businesses generally need to see cost savings in order to justify switching to an electric vehicle fleet.

“They need the rates to be better than gas or diesel if they’re going to give up their diesel bus or truck,” said Cal Silcox, clean transportation strategy manager at California utility Pacific Gas & Electric.

Right now, there’s no guarantee that commercial and industrial customers in PG&E territory will see any fuel savings, he said. That’s largely because of the demand charges C&I customers are required to pay when their electricity use spikes — such as during a high-powered EV charging event.

That’s why PG&E is hoping to replace demand charges with a new subscription rate plan for customers that are using commercial EV (CEV) charging. The proposal, submitted to the California Public Utilities Commission Monday, allows customers to choose the amount of power they need for their charging stations and pay for it with a flat monthly fee — similar to picking a cellphone data plan.

The proposal would create a new rate class for CEV charging and would offer two types of rates within that: one for customers with charging up to 100 kilowatts and one for customers with charging over 100 kilowatts.

“As EV charging stations become more common in places such as multi-family residences, businesses, transit stations and other commercial spaces, PG&E has recognized that the existing rate structure does not best meet the needs of commercial EV charging,” according to a company press release. “Currently, public or fleet EV chargers on PG&E’s commercial electric rates can see higher costs than the typical business customer, on average. These costs pose challenges to the expansion of EVs and needed charging stations.”

CEV customers currently pay 30-40 cents per kilowatt-hour in PG&E territory, while commercial buildings pay 18-25 cents per kilowatt-hour, Silcox explained. The new plan brings customer costs in line with their cost of service. PG&E’s modeling shows that it could save a transit agency, for instance, 20-34 percent on what it is paying today.

“We think it should get the price down to equal or less than the cost of diesel so it’s competitive and…makes the business case for going electric positive for them,” he said.

While the subscription fee is lower than the demand charges PG&E’s commercial customers currently pay, the plan is not unlimited. So if a customer’s electricity usage exceeds its rate program, it will have to pay for overages. But because the plan is monthly (rather than yearly, as some commercial rates are), customers have more insight into their usage and can adjust quickly to avoid additional payments in the future.

Also, any CEV customer that buys a plan covering their maximum charging capacity installed on site should never go over that limit, unless they add more chargers. Some customers may intentionally pick a subscription plan that covers less load than their charging stations require, running the risk of overages. But they would only elect to do so if they thought they could save more money through managed charging.

In that scenario, imagine a transit agency has a fleet of five electric buses and five 50-kilowatt chargers to fuel them up, said Silcox. The agency could either buy a 250-kilowatt subscription plan and cover all of its needs for the five buses, or purchase a 200-kilowatt plan and cover the remaining 50 kilowatts of charging load with energy storage or load management and potentially pay less overall.

The new proposed rate also includes a basic time-of-use structure that remains the same every day of the week and throughout the year. The time-of-use rate is specifically designed to encourage CEV charging during the middle of the day (with super off-peak rates offered between 9 a.m. and 2 p.m.) so that customers are taking advantage of California’s surplus solar power.

Peak hours would start at 4 p.m. under the subscription plan, which aligns with new time periods approved by the California Public Utilities Commission earlier this year. The peak period for CEV customers would end at 10 p.m. (an hour later than other customers), when prices start to decline again.

A new approach to ratemaking

PG&E has been working with California’s other investor-owned utilities to develop a new framework for designing rates, which is focused less on conventional rate classes and more on meeting a customer’s specific needs, for, say, EV charging. The utilities recently outlined this “modern rate architecture” concept in a white paper.

Margot Everett, senior director of rates and regulatory analytics at PG&E, said the fundamental idea is that rates need to get more granular in order to reflect how electricity customers actually use a utility’s products, which include energy generation, as well as the poles-and-wires delivery system, other services around that, and the utility’s public policy initiatives such as low-income programs. This approach also involves creating a rate that reflects a customer’s fair share of their cost of service, without creating other distortions in rate design.

“That’s the direction the state is going,” Everett said. “Really creating transparency around rates, really making sure our rates are meeting customers’ needs and making sure customers are paying for what they use…and not paying for other people’s costs.”

When asked why other utilities don’t take the same approach, Everett posited it’s mostly because they’re hesitant to do so.

“I think you’re going against a norm that’s been part of rate design for 100 years,” she said. “Creating rate classes based on how big you are or who you are, your demographic…is just the way utilities have been doing this for years.”

“Other utilities can start thinking in terms of creating different customer classes and recognizing that with technology evolution and customer choice, customers are not as homogenous as they used to be,” Everett continued. “This type of rate design worked fine in the 1970s, when everybody had pretty much the same type of load. […] Now you have customers that have a lot of choice, and we need to be thinking about how our customers are different and [considering] that it costs us something different to serve them.”

Moving to this new ratemaking model will require finding ways to gather more data. It could also be met with some pushback. Rooftop solar supporters have long opposed putting solar customers into a separate rate class from other residential customers, because these proposals typically reduce the economic benefits of going solar.

Things could be changing now that the solar market is maturing, though. And things could be different for EVs from the get-go, given that the additional load is generally a positive thing for utilities, whereas rooftop solar took load away.

PG&E says stakeholders have generally reacted favorably to the new subscription rate proposal so far. Everett said the California Public Utilities Commission and the advocacy group at the commission have also seen the plan receive positive responses. Regulators are highly motivated to approve this rate or something like it, she said, given that California’s two other investor-owned utilities already have CEV rates in place.

Because PG&E’s latest proposal isn’t tied to an EV infrastructure build-out and consequently doesn’t come with a big rate request, as previous EV filings have, the utility is hopeful it will move quickly.

Some industry members are too.

“ChargePoint applauds PG&E for the innovative commercial electric vehicle rate proposal that will, if approved, benefit EV drivers by significantly reducing barriers for operating charging stations in California,” said Renee Samson, director of utility solutions for ChargePoint, in a statement. ChargePoint hopes the new rate design will serve as an example for utilities around the country moving to support transportation electrification.”

“Creative new rate designs that help transit fleets like ours save on fuel costs will help enable us to make the transition to a 100 percent clean fleet, further reducing emissions on behalf of the residents that rely upon our fleet for safe, efficient, and reliable transportation throughout San Joaquin County,” said Donna DeMartino, chief executive officer for San Joaquin Regional Transit District. “PG&E’s proposed rate design provides a critical portion of that solution, and its approval will help bring us closer to our zero emissions goal.”

 

PG&E Proposes Ditching Demand Charges for Commercial EV Charging, by Julia Pyper, Greentech Media,  November 7, 2018.

Electrify America Announces Second $200M Zero Emission Vehicle Investment Plan For California

Electrify America announced its next $200 million investment in Zero Emission Vehicle (ZEV) infrastructure as well as education and awareness in California which is outlined in its Cycle 2 California ZEV Investment Plan submitted to the California Air Resources Board (CARB). Cycle 2 is a 30-month investment period, which begins in July 2019.

The investment will build on Electrify America’s initial priorities and expand into new areas, where the need for electric vehicle charging stations and technology are greatest or are most likely to be used regularly. Consistent with the guidance of CARB, Electrify America plans strive to ensure that 35 percent of Cycle 2 investments are in low-income or disadvantaged communities.

Highlights of the California Cycle 2 ZEV Investment Plan include:

– Metropolitan Areas: The central focus of electric vehicle charging infrastructure investment in Cycle 2 will shift to more DC Fast Charging (DCFC) stations within metro areas, where electric vehicle (EV) drivers are expected to charge most often. Electrify America will invest in nine metro areas inside California, including these new metro areas added for Cycle 2: Riverside-San Bernardino, Santa Cruz-Watsonville and Santa Rosa.

Electrify America also will continue to invest in the six Cycle 1 metros: Fresno, Los Angeles-Long Beach-Anaheim, Sacramento-Roseville-Arden-Arcade, San Diego-Carlsbad, San Francisco-Oakland-Hayward and San Jose-Sunnyvale-Santa Clara.

These metro areas are expected to account for 89 percent of expected battery electric vehicles (BEVs) in operation through 2022, according to a 2017 Navigant report. The DC Fast Charging stations will be placed in retail locations but also consider the needs of adjacent multi-unit dwellings where Level 2 (L2) residential charging deployment is oftentimes challenging.

Electrify America also will invest in DCFC stations specifically targeting shared mobility drivers – car share, taxis and transportation networking company (TNC) drivers.

– Highways & Regional Routes: The new Cycle 2 investments announced today will continue to build out a highway network of DCFC stations featuring charging power up to 350 kilowatts which can refuel a vehicle at up to 20 miles of range per minute. This will include building new sites connecting regional destinations, such as supporting travel to the Sierra Mountain communities and destinations like Lake Havasu.

– Residential: The primary, most convenient and cost efficient fueling option for many drivers is residential charging. The Office of Energy Efficiency & Renewable Energy at the Department of Energy reports that EV drivers conduct ‘more than 80 percent of their charging at home.’ However, the cost and complexity of installing home charging can be a barrier to ZEV adoption for some buyers, especially in low-income communities. To address this need, Electrify America will develop a comprehensive residential charging solution.

First, Electrify America will develop an online tool that promotes and connects EV buyers with the wide range of residential charging incentives and rebates already available in California and simplifies the application process. This program will be designed to integrate with CARB’s recently announced ‘one-stop-shop,’ which focuses on incentives for the ZEV purchase itself, and together these offerings will provide customers support throughout the entire purchase process.

In addition, Electrify America will offer ‘no-money-down’ residential chargers and installation, enabling buyers who cannot or choose not to pay for the L2 charger installation at home. The cost of installation will be incorporated into a monthly fee.

Finally, Electrify America will develop a platform that will allow drivers with a home charger to earn financial rewards for plugging in and supporting a demand response platform for grid electric power stability.

– Bus and Shuttle Charging: To help spur adoption in this sector, Electrify America plans to collaborate with transit operators to provide charging infrastructure at depots, layover points, and on key routes. This approach offers another means of serving disadvantaged and low-income populations who rely on public transportation.

– Rural: To further support the adoption of ZEVs in rural communities in California, Electrify America will deploy L2 chargers in rural areas with a potential focus on health care facilities and education institutions located in the Central, Coachella and Imperial Valleys.

– Autonomous: To support the growth of autonomous ZEVs, Electrify America will build up to two commercial deployments of charging stations for autonomous electric vehicles where this need is emerging.

Renewable Generation: Electrify America will invest in renewable generation for select stations to help to reduce station operating costs and reduce the carbon content for EV refueling which is consistent with California’s broader air quality goals.

– Education and Awareness: In Cycle 2, Electrify America will invest in additional education, awareness, and outreach activities to help drive ZEV adoption. Efforts will primarily focus on boosting awareness and consideration by informing the general public on the benefits of ZEVs through traditional media advertising, similar to Electrify America’s Cycle 1 “JetStones” TV/radio campaign. Electrify America’s marketing outreach will continue to coordinate with ZEV awareness initiatives by collaborating with key non-profit organizations like Veloz.

Electrify America also will work to generate awareness of its charging network to promote station utilization through digital activations and targeted digital media interactions such as paid search and web banners for specific groups most likely to be able to utilize the Electrify America charging network.

Electrify America will continue to support the Green City Initiative in Sacramento. The initiative, which includes two ZEV car share programs, two BEV bus/shuttle services and substantial investments in associated charging infrastructure, will showcase new uses of ZEV technology while promoting increased ZEV usage across many channels serving low-income or disadvantaged communities. While these programs are funded in Cycle 1, the services – and benefits – of this $44 million Cycle 1 investment will launch and be fully operational during Cycle 2. Electrify America will provide strategic guidance and operational support for these services over the course of Cycle 2.

The California Cycle 2 ZEV Investment Plan benefited from collaboration with the California Air Resources Board and Staff and a comprehensive national outreach period, during which Electrify America received more than 700 submissions and spoke with more than 100 individual submitters. The company held community meetings across California focused on local government and community-based organizations and engaged with California’s leading academics at UC Davis, UCLA and the National Laboratories.

Electrify America was established to implement the $2 billion ZEV Investment Commitment outlined in Volkswagen’s Court-approved settlement involving 2.0L TDI diesel vehicles in the United States. The investments will be made in four, 30-month investment cycles that will direct $800 million in electric vehicle infrastructure, education and access programs in California, one of the largest ZEV markets in the world; $1.2 billion is budgeted for states outside California through 2026.

Under the Consent Decree for this settlement, investment decisions are Electrify America’s to make and plans are subject to review by the California Air Resources Board (CARB) and the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) for consistency with the requirements of the Consent Decree.

 

Electrify America Announces Second $200M Zero Emission Vehicle Investment Plan For California, by Blagojce Krivevski, Electric Cars Report, October 4, 2018.

Peninsula Clean Energy Electric Vehicle Program Offers Thousands of Dollars in Savings for San Mateo County Residents

REDWOOD CITY, Calif. – October 1, 2018 – Residents in San Mateo County can now save thousands of dollars on electric vehicles due to a Peninsula Clean Energy (PCE) partnership with local auto dealerships. PCE has arranged for participating dealers to offer attractive savings to San Mateo County residents wishing to buy or lease select electric car models between October 1 and December 31, 2018.

The program can save customers $4,000 or more on a new electric vehicle (EV). Participating dealerships are Stewart Chevrolet of Colma offering the Chevrolet Volt and Bolt, and Putnam Nissan of Burlingame offering the Nissan Leaf.

“Peninsula Clean Energy was founded to fight climate change, and inspiring customers to get into an electric vehicle not only reduces or eliminates greenhouse gas emissions but also reduces a driver’s overall cost of travel,” said CEO Jan Pepper. “We are finding tremendous local interest in EVs during our test drive events, and now we want to do everything possible to help people switch from gas-guzzlers to a cleaner, comfortable, and affordable EV.”

Nearly 600 people have tested an electric vehicle during PCE’s ongoing free test drive events held at various San Mateo County locations. Upcoming test drive events include:

Customers interested in getting $4,000 or more in participating dealer discounts can go to PeninsulaCleanEnergy.com/EV for more information. Eligible state and federal tax benefits further decrease EV prices for qualified customers.

“There’s never been a better time to consider getting an electric vehicle. Customers can save thousands of dollars as well as help our air quality,” said Pepper. “Once you have an EV, you save another $1,200 or more a year in fuel and maintenance costs compared to an average gas-powered vehicle.”

San Mateo County electric vehicle drivers also get the benefit of Peninsula Clean Energy’s cleaner energy at lower rates compared to PG&E’s electricity mix. PG&E still maintains power lines and provides billing services. PCE customers are eligible for PG&E programs and incentives including the California Clean Fuel Rebate.

About Peninsula Clean Energy

Peninsula Clean Energy (PCE) is San Mateo County’s official electricity provider. PCE (www.PeninsulaCleanEnergy.com) is a public local community choice energy program that provides all electric customers in San Mateo County with cleaner electricity at lower rates than those charged by Pacific Gas & Electric. PCE is projected to save customers more than $17 million a year. PCE, formed in March 2016, is a joint powers authority made up of the County of San Mateo and all 20 cities and towns in the County. PCE serves approximately 290,000 accounts.

Kirsten Andrews-Schwind
Communications and Outreach Manager
Peninsula Clean Energy
kandrews-schwind@peninsulacleanenergy.com
Phone: (650) 260-0096

Visit us at:
www.peninsulacleanenergy.com

Porsche drops diesel engines, switches to hybrid and electric power for alternative energy

PORSCHE once famously pledged it would never build a diesel car — then went on to sell thousands of diesel-powered Cayenne SUVs.

Indeed, diesel cars accounted for 12 per cent of all Porsches sold last year alone.

But times have changed.

After almost 10 years of using engines once deemed to be unbecoming for a Porsche, the performance brand is set to drop diesels forever.

A diesel option was conspicuous by its absence when the new, third-generation Cayenne went on sale earlier this year.

Last year the company initially said a new diesel Cayenne was in the works but didn’t provide any details.

It was rumoured Porsche was doing its own emissions work on a new engine rather than relying on parent company and diesel engine supplier Volkswagen in the wake of the “dieselgate” scandal.

But in an apparent U-turn some time in the past few months diesel is now off the cards for Porsche.

“Porsche is not demonising diesel. It is, and will remain, an important propulsion technology,” Porsche Chief Executive Oliver Blume said in a statement issued over the weekend.

“We as a sports car manufacturer, however, for whom diesel has always played a secondary role, have come to the conclusion that we would like our future to be diesel-free.”

The company assured owners of existing diesel vehicles they will continue to be supported with parts and service.

Porsche says demand for diesels is dropping globally and it will instead invest more than 6 billion euros ($9.9 billion) in hybrid and electric technology by 2022.

“We have never developed and produced diesel engines ourselves. Still, Porsche’s image has suffered. The diesel crisis has caused us a lot of trouble,” Blume was quoted as saying in an interview with German newspaper Bild am Sonntag.

Porsche’s announcement came the same day as a meeting was held by German Chancellor Angela Merkel to investigate whether the car industry should pay for costly hardware upgrades for older diesel vehicles.

Next year, Porsche will launch its first fully electric car the Taycan. It already has a plug-in hybrid versions of the Panamera sedan and Cayenne SUV.

The next generation Porsche 911 will also be available with plug-in hybrid power, although it is unclear if it will arrive with the new model next year or be introduced later in the model cycle.

Porsche has promised the plug-in hybrid 911 will be “the most powerful 911 we’ve ever had; 700 horsepower might be possible.”

It will also have a “special button for the electric punch”, similar to a ‘push to pass’ button in Formula One.

 

Porsche drops diesel engines, switches to hybrid and electric power for alternative energy, by Joshua Dowling, News.com.au, September 24, 2018.

MCE Launches Electric Vehicle Programs, Offers Competitive Rates

SAN RAFAEL and CONCORD, Calif. — MCE has launched a generous rebate program to lower the cost of installing electric vehicle (EV) charging stations at workplace and multifamily properties. The program also offers rebates to low-income qualifying customers on the purchase or lease of new and used EVs.

“Transportation is the largest greenhouse gas-emitting sector in our service area and in California,” said Dawn Weisz, CEO of MCE. “This program is grounded in our mission and is focused on our customers — particularly those in underserved communities, reduces vehicle-related emissions, and provides greater access to EV charging where people live and work.”

EV Rebates for Low-Income Qualifying Customers

MCE is offering a $3,500 rebate for low-income qualifying customers to purchase or lease either a new or used EV. Additionally, MCE can help qualifying customers combine this rebate with Federal, State, and local incentives for a total discount of up to $12,000 for a new EV or $9,000 for a used EV. The final price of a used EV could now be as low as $2,000 after rebates. Qualifying households must receive MCE service and either be enrolled in California Alternate Rates for Energy (CARE), Family Electric Rate Assistance (FERA), or have an annual household income at or below 200 percent of the federal poverty level.

EV Charging Station Rebates for Workplaces & Multifamily Properties

MCE’s EV charging rebate program covers both large and small charging projects (from two to 20+ ports), allowing market rate and low-income multifamily properties and workplaces of any size and sector (including local government agencies) to save on hardware and installation costs — up to $2,500 per port. MCE will provide technical assistance in the application and installation process.

MCE’s EV program aims to add over 500 charging ports and 100 EVs to low-income households within MCE’s service area by March 2019. Improving charger access (particularly for renters and commuters) and reducing the purchasing price of EVs addresses two of the top barriers cited for owning an EV.

“MCE’s rebate program supports EV adoption by providing much-needed charging infrastructure, while making EVs less expensive than fossil-fueled cars for people who may not have the budget for car ownership otherwise,” said Contra Costa County Supervisor and California Air Resources Board Member, John Gioia. “Replacing a single gasoline-powered car with an EV eliminates an average of 4.6 metric tons of air pollution, which is like avoiding a trip of over 11,000 miles in a car.”

MCE’s EV Charging Rates

MCE’s residential EV rates are lower than investor-owned utility rates, providing EV drivers a cost-effective way of charging their car at home. MCE’s EV rates are flat, based on the time of day when a car is charged, with incentives for charging during off-peak usage hours, like at night when charging is least expensive. This helps to support the grid by shifting load away from times of the day when usage is high and there is more strain on the grid towards times when generation is plentiful and overall usage is low.

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About MCE: MCE is a not-for-profit, community choice electricity provider that provides all customers with electricity supplied from 50% to 100% clean, renewable sources such as solar, wind, bioenergy, geothermal, and hydroelectric at competitive rates. MCE provides service to approximately 470,000 California customers in Marin County, Napa County, unincorporated Contra Costa County, and the cities of Benicia, Concord, Danville, El Cerrito, Lafayette, Martinez, Moraga, Oakley, Pinole, Pittsburg, Richmond, San Pablo, San Ramon, and Walnut Creek. For more information about MCE, visit mceCleanEnergy.org.

Electric Vehicle Owners Join up to Advocate, Share Info

There’s a new group in town — the Davis Electric Vehicle Association!

As an affiliated sub-group of the Sacramento Electric Vehicle Association (SacEV), a chapter of the national nonprofit Electric Auto Association, DEVA advocates for electric vehicle adoption and supports the development of EV infrastructure regionally.

DEVA is a special kind of car club made up of electric vehicle owners, prospective owners and enthusiasts from the Davis and Sacramento area and is a working group of Cool Davis.

DEVA held its first meeting, hosted by members of SacEv and Cool Davis, on Aug. 27, when 24 members gathered to share stories and enthusiasm for alternative fuel vehicles.

At upcoming DEVA events, community members can experience EVs from behind the wheel. Johan Verink/Courtesy photo

“I can do anything I need to do around town (in my Volt), and I don’t need gas,” said member Katrina Sutton, a program analyst for the Plug-in Hybrid & Electric Vehicle Research Center at UC Davis. “It’s just awesome!”

Sutton said she joined DEVA because she likes to talk to people “who are on the fence” about EVs, while encouraging EV adoption and sharing stories with fellow EV owners. She sees DEVA as an opportunity to “encourage people to reduce emissions and join the community in a fun way.”

DEVA meetings will host guest speakers presenting on various EV topics. The group’s first meeting featured Robert Haran’s presentation on vehicle-to-grid technology, a potential way for plug-in EVs to transfer energy back and forth to the grid.

Members discussed future meeting guest speakers (possibly from Tesla) and topics such as EV market updates, the Valley Clean Energy Alliance, EV charging and battery care, PG&E EV charging station rollouts and EV travel stories.

The group also proposed fun events like a Davis EV parade and field trips to the California Independent System Operator and the Wind Farm.

First up is an EV Show & Tell from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. Saturday, Sept. 16, on Fourth Street between C and D streets, adjacent to the Farmers Market. The event will feature ride-and-drive opportunities with dealer vehicles and several workshops, including “EV 101 — What EV is Right For Me?,” “Charging Levels, Power and Your Electricity Bill,” “EV/PV Driving on Sunshine!” and “EV Future — New Tech, Battery Backup and Autonomous Vehicles.”

Ride-and-drive vehicles will include Nissan Leaf, Chevy Bolt and Volt, Honda Clarity, BMW i3, Ford Focus, Ford Cmax and Ford Fusion.

Show-and-tell vehicles will include Fiat 500e, Honda Clarity, Kia Soul, Tesla S and X, Chevy Bolt, Nissan Leaf and Toyota Rav 4.

DEVA also plans to host an EV/PV Home Tour on Sunday, Oct. 22. Details will be forthcoming.

DEVA plans to meet every other month; the next meeting will be in October, with the date, time and location to be announced. For more information, email deva@cooldavis.org.

More resources:

* National Drive Electric Week: https://driveelectricweek.org
* Sacramento Electric Vehicle Association: https://www.saceva.org/cars

Electric Vehicle Owners Join up to Advocate, Share Info, by Jessica Driver, The Davis Enterprise, September 14, 2017.